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Darkest Hour

Darkest Hour stands apart from more routine historical dramas.

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The Man Who Invented Christmas

Not particularly keen on nuance or subtlety, this is a film in which everything, especially Stevens’ decidedly manic take on Dickens, is pitched as broadly…

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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* This filmography is not intended to be a comprehensive list of this artist’s work. Instead it reflects the films this person has been involved with that have been reviewed on this site.

#312 October 3, 2017

Matt writes: This year's film festivals in Venice, Telluride and Toronto offered plenty of enticing titles set to open over the next few months, and RogerEbert.com publisher Chaz Ebert decided to highlight some of her favorites. In an essay entitled "Cupid Pierced My Tender Heart at the Movies," Ebert provides numerous recommendations, including captivating romances by Guillermo del Toro ("The Shape of Water"), Wim Wenders ("Submergence"), Paul McGuigan ("Film Stars Don't Die in Liverpool") and Luca Guadagnino ("Call Me by Your Name").

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#306 July 11, 2017

Matt writes: One of the most acclaimed films of 2017 thus far is Edgar Wright's "Baby Driver," a cinematic adrenaline rush for the ages. It's the best fusion of ingenious car chases and equally imaginative song choices I've seen since "The Blues Brothers," and at RogerEbert.com, we have provided in-depth coverage of the picture, beginning with Brian Tallerico's three-and-a-half star review. Nell Minow conducted a terrific interview with Wright, Nick Allen analyzed Wright's rarely seen first feature ("A Fistful of Fingers") and Diana Drumm explored Wright's identity as "a true cinephile."

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