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If Beale Street Could Talk

Jenkins’ decision to let the original storyteller live and breathe throughout If Beale Street Can Talk is a wise one.

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Schindler's List

What is most amazing about this film is how completely Spielberg serves his story. The movie is brilliantly acted, written, directed and seen. Individual scenes…

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Schindler's List

This was published on June 24th, 2001, and we are republishing it in honor of the film's 25th anniversary rerelease."Schindler's List" is described as a…

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Cast and Crew

* This filmography is not intended to be a comprehensive list of this artist’s work. Instead it reflects the films this person has been involved with that have been reviewed on this site.

#339 October 16, 2018

Matt writes: Scott Wilson (1942-2018) may be best known to modern viewers for his work on "The Walking Dead," yet his great screen career spanned several decades and included numerous memorable performances. His first two films, both released in 1967, proved to be classics: "In the Heat of the Night" and "In Cold Blood." He earned a Golden Globe nomination for acting opposite Stacy Keach in William Peter Blatty's 1980 horror offering, "The Ninth Configuration," and went on to be featured in unforgettable pictures such as "The Right Stuff," "Dead Man Walking" and "Junebug."

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#304 June 13, 2017

Matt writes: We are certain that Roger Ebert would've been thrilled by director Patty Jenkins' recent record-shattering triumph. Her superhero blockbuster, "Wonder Woman," had the highest-grossing opening weekend for a film directed by a woman, and has earned widespread acclaim from both audiences and critics (including our own). It is only Jenkins' second feature, arriving 14 years after her astonishing debut, "Monster," which was hailed by Ebert as the best film of 2003, containing a performance by Charlize Theron that was dubbed by the critic as one of the greatest in cinema history (Theron went on to win the Best Actress Oscar).

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