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Steve Jobs

The fact that he doesn’t try to redeem these flawed, fascinating figures—or even try to make you like them in the slightest way—feels like an…


Knock Knock

As a piece of social satire, Knock Knock winds up being not just toothless but anticlimactic.

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…


Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

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* This filmography is not intended to be a comprehensive list of this artist’s work. Instead it reflects the films this person has been involved with that have been reviewed on this site.

#256 July 8, 2015

Sheila writes: Filmmaker (and Ebertfest favorite) Ramin Bahrani has directed a new documentary short called "Lift You Up," profiling a man named Glyn Stewart. Bahrani met Stewart in a food bank while filming a commercial in North Carolina, and knew he wanted to make a film about him. In an interview on, Bahrani says, "I liked him immediately. He had an electric personality. He was so intent on laughing and hugging everyone, that I assumed he must be harboring a profound sadness. I wanted to know why." You can read the full interview with Bahrani, as well as view "Lift You Up" over on

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#252 May 13, 2015

Sheila writes: Roger Ebert included Orson Welles' 1965 "Chimes at Midnight" in his Great Movies series, writing, in 2006, "It dropped so completely out of sight that there is no video version in America, Britain or France. Preparing to attend the epic production of both parts of Shakespeare's "Henry IV" at the Chicago Shakespeare Theater, I wanted to see it again and found it available on DVD from Spain and Brazil. Both versions carry the original English-language soundtrack; the Brazilian disc is clear enough and a thing of beauty. What luck that Welles shot in black-and-white, so there was no color to fade."

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