In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

RogerEbert.com

Zombieland: Double Tap

The vast majority of sequels are unnecessary, but Zombieland: Double Tap feels particularly so, especially coming out a decade after the original.

The Cave

Beyond the human need to hear and see these stories, it’s a beautifully shot documentary that’s as stunning as the images are harrowing.

Other reviews
Review Archives

Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

Other reviews
Great Movie Archives
Other articles
Far Flunger Archives

Cast and crew

* This filmography is not intended to be a comprehensive list of this artist’s work. Instead it reflects the films this person has been involved with that have been reviewed on this site.

#364 October 1, 2019

Matt writes: Last month's Venice Film Festival presented its top prize to this week's most anticipated wide release, Todd Phillips' "Joker" (starring Joaquin Phoenix), a film that has received polarizing reviews from critics, including those featured on our site.

Continue reading →

#356 June 11, 2019

Matt writes: Sometimes the job of a critic is to provide a platform for films not receiving their deserved attention from audiences. In light of its underwhelming box office numbers, I'd like to place a spotlight on one of the year's most acclaimed movies, Olivia Wilde's "Booksmart," a wonderful comedy about teenage friends encouraged to break the rules in their final hours as high schoolers.

Continue reading →

#298 March 21, 2017

Matt writes: In his list ranking the best films of 1987, Roger Ebert included Taylor Hackford’s “Chuck Berry: Hail! Hail! Rock and Roll!,” calling it “the year's best musical documentary, a rollicking and sometimes revealing record of the attempt by Rolling Stone Keith Richards to stage a 60th birthday concert for Berry, at which the pioneer of rock and roll would at last be accompanied by a well-rehearsed backup band.” After Berry passed away last weekend, our critic Glenn Kenny penned an insightful obituary that paid tribute to Hackford’s film. “Aside from being a superb portrait of Berry—and of Richards, whose intelligence and clear devotion to music here belies his sometime rap as a wizened five-string-zombie,” wrote Kenny, “[it] is one of the great rock and roll documentaries.” And of Berry, Kenny argued, “For all the great things he achieved, he deserves to be the fifth face on Mount Rushmore.”

Continue reading →