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The Killing of a Sacred Deer

With uniformly great performances throughout the cast and Lanthimos’ stunning eye for detail and composition, this is one of the most unforgettable films of the…

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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* This filmography is not intended to be a comprehensive list of this artist’s work. Instead it reflects the films this person has been involved with that have been reviewed on this site.

#295 February 7, 2017

Matt writes: You don't have to be a sports fan to enjoy the spectacle and exhilaration of the Super Bowl, and the same is true of sports films. There are endless uplifting pictures charting the triumph of underdogs in various sports, with football being one of the most crowd-pleasing. Roger Ebert gave favorable reviews to several of them, including Warren Beatty and Buck Henry's very funny 1978 comedy, "Heaven Can Wait," Gurinder Chadha's delightful 2002 dramedy, "Bend It Like Beckham" and Peter Berg's 2004 drama, "Friday Night Lights."

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#290 November 29, 2016

Matt writes: Living legend Warren Beatty has a new film in theaters—his first in 18 years—and it has received quite a bit of coverage at RogerEbert.com. Matt Zoller Seitz awarded the film three stars, while Brian Tallerico interviewed Beatty along with the film's two young stars, Alden Ehrenreich (the future Han Solo) and Lily Collins. Yet in addition to these new articles, our site contains a wealth of archival interviews with Beatty conducted by Roger Ebert, including this essential conversation from 1967, in which Beatty discusses the controversial violence in "Bonnie and Clyde" famously panned by The New York Times critic Bosley Crowther.

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