Roger Ebert Home

Michel Gondry

Reviews

Mood Indigo (2014)
The We and the I (2013)
Tokyo! (2009)
Be Kind Rewind (2008)
Human Nature (2002)

Blog Posts

Ebert Club

#391 October 13, 2020

Matt writes: On October 8th, our site's publisher Chaz Ebert joined Dr. Nate Kohn in moderating the first virtual panel for the 2020 Ebert Symposium. Entitled "The Film Industry in a Time of Change," the insightful conversation featured such distinguished panelists as Michael Barker, Co-President and Co-Founder of Sony Pictures Classics; Neal Block, Head of Distribution and Marketing for Magnolia Pictures; Darrien Michele Gipson, Executive Director of SAGindie; Melissa Haizlip, director of "Mr. Soul!"; Malcolm D. Lee, director of "Girls Trip"; Mary Mazzio, director of "A Most Beautiful Thing"; Nina Shaw, founding partner in the entertainment law firm of Del Shaw Moonves Tanaka Finkelstein & Lezcano; and Christine Swanson, director of "The Clark Sisters: First Ladies of Gospel."

Ebert Club

#165 May 1, 2013

Marie writes: Intrepid club member Sandy Khan has sent us the following awesome find, courtesy of a pal in Belgium who'd first shared it with her. "Got Muck?" was filmed by diver Khaled Sultani (Emirates Diving Association's (EDA) in the Lembeh Strait, off the island coast of Sulawesi in Indonesia. Camera: Sony Cx550 using Light & Motion housing and sola lights. Song: "man with the movie camera" by cinematic orchestra.

Ebert Club

#160 March 20, 2013

Marie writes: It's no secret there's no love lost between myself and what I regard as London's newest blight; The Shard. That said, I also love a great view. Go here to visit a 360-degree augmented-reality panorama from the building's public observation deck while listening to the sounds of city, including wind, traffic, birds and even Big Ben.

Ebert Club

#153 January 30, 2013

Marie writes: Kudos to fellow art buddy Siri Arnet for sharing the following; a truly unique hotel just outside Nairobi, Kenya: welcome to Giraffe Manor.

Far Flungers

Cinema through a cloudy eye

Bolstered by Akira Ifukube's trudging "Gojira" theme and the shorthand it affords, on two separate filmic occasions director Leos Carax chose to pair it with a city-scrolling vista, and in doing so reference his past work for the first time. Homage and visual motifs have always earmarked the enigmatic auteur's films, namely in the unstable romances of "Boy Meets Girl" and "Les Amants de Pont Neuf," but within his two most recent efforts -- a section of the 2008 triptych "Tokyo!" and his 2012 vexing "Holy Motors" -- he centers this rare repetition on one character that is not so much a reprisal as it is an emotional transformation.