Peter Sellers

Reviews

Being There (1979)
The Party (1968)
Casino Royale (1967)

Blog Posts

Ebert Club

#381 May 26, 2020

Matt writes: Steve James' acclaimed 2014 documentary "Life Itself," chronicling the life and legacy of our site's co-founder, Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic Roger Ebert, premiered in virtual cinemas this past Friday as part of Magnolia Pictures' new screening series entitled, "A Few of Our Favorite Docs." Each of the films will have a virtual Q&A on the Wednesday following their premiere, while ten percent of the ticket sales will be donated to a charity of the filmmakers' choice. One of the subjects in "Life Itself", RogerEbert.com publisher Chaz Ebert, will take part in a virtual Q&A with Steve James TOMORROW, May 27th.

Features

thumbnails 9/23/2013

An online community for men who believe female oppression is a myth; a thick glass ceiling for women conductors; how "Breaking Bad" redeemed its worst mistakes; Britt Ekland talks shop (and Sellers); NY regulators crack down on fake Internet reviews.

May contain spoilers

Far Flungers

A comedy that keeps swimming

No cinematic genre lends itself less for repeated viewings than comedy. Finding a truly funny picture is hard enough (not that you could tell from the typical reactions at a "Fockers" screening) and besides, how many times can people laugh at the same joke? Comedies also tend to age the worst. Among those that I recall once driving audiences wild here in México were "The Party" (1967), starring Peter Sellers, with all the guests falling into a pool full of bubbles, and Peter Bogdanovich's zany screwball feature "What's up Doc?" (1972), but watching them today mostly leaves me cold.