In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

RogerEbert.com

Thumb_split_ver3

Split

It’s exciting to see Shyamalan on such confident footing once more, all these years later.

Other Reviews
Review Archives
Thumb_xbepftvyieurxopaxyzgtgtkwgw

Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

Other Reviews
Great Movie Archives
Other Articles
Festivals & Awards Archives
Other Articles
Blog Archives

Cast and Crew

* This filmography is not intended to be a comprehensive list of this artist’s work. Instead it reflects the films this person has been involved with that have been reviewed on this site.

#291 December 13, 2016

Matt writes: At RogerEbert.com, we recently published a thoughtful essay by Pete Croatto in which he makes his case for "why film critics should see bad movies." Of course, how can one judge what is good if they ignore what is bad? Many of Roger Ebert's most entertaining reviews were the ones where he eviscerated a bad movie with his scathing wit and unbridled love for the oft-squandered potential of the art form. Three books have been devoted to compiling the best of Roger's negative reviews, and they were recently paid tribute by critic Brent Northup in his review of "Shut In" for Helenair.com. My personal favorite of Roger's bad movie takedowns was his half-star review of 1997's disastrous live-action comedy, "Mr. Magoo."

Continue reading →

#290 November 29, 2016

Matt writes: Living legend Warren Beatty has a new film in theaters—his first in 18 years—and it has received quite a bit of coverage at RogerEbert.com. Matt Zoller Seitz awarded the film three stars, while Brian Tallerico interviewed Beatty along with the film's two young stars, Alden Ehrenreich (the future Han Solo) and Lily Collins. Yet in addition to these new articles, our site contains a wealth of archival interviews with Beatty conducted by Roger Ebert, including this essential conversation from 1967, in which Beatty discusses the controversial violence in "Bonnie and Clyde" famously panned by The New York Times critic Bosley Crowther.

Continue reading →

#288 November 1, 2016

Matt writes: While interviewing the great German director Werner Herzog at this year's Toronto International Film Festival about his stunning new documentary, "Into the Inferno," he explained to his collaborator on the project, volcanologist Clive Oppenheimer, about who Roger Ebert was. “Roger Ebert was the last mammoth alive who was holding the flag for real movies and moviemakers,” he explained. “He was a very valiant soldier of cinema who passed away, and we miss him. It’s over with serious discourse about cinema in the print media and on television. It has been replaced by celebrity news. So we are speaking in his spirit always.”

Continue reading →

#287 October 18, 2016

Matt writes: Movie lovers sorely missing a new book featuring the work of Roger Ebert are now in luck. The fourth installment of Ebert's celebrated book series, The Great Movies, is now on sale, compiling the critic's final 62 essays on indispensable films that he considered truly great.

Continue reading →