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The Sea of Trees

The Sea of Trees uses depression, cancer and suicide as manipulative devices to tug at heartstrings instead of offering even the slightest insight into the…

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Don't Breathe

Don’t Breathe gets a little less interesting as it proceeds to its inevitable conclusion, but it works so well up to that point that your…

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The Decalogue

On Kieslowski's "The Decalogue," now being released theatrically in restored form and soon on Criterion Blu-ray.

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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* This filmography is not intended to be a comprehensive list of this artist’s work. Instead it reflects the films this person has been involved with that have been reviewed on this site.

#281 July 26, 2016

Matt writes: Garry Marshall, the comedy mastermind behind several iconic TV shows and hit films, died last Tuesday at age 81. He leaves behind a rich legacy that did not go unnoticed by Roger Ebert. The critic greatly admired Marshall's 1984 film, "The Flamingo Kid," hailing its star, Matt Dillon, as a revelation. Ebert also loved Marshall's phenomenally successful 1990 romantic comedy, "Pretty Women," which launched the career of Julia Roberts. "[Marshall's] films betray an instinctive good nature," wrote Ebert in his three-and-a-half-star review, "and [this film] is about as warmhearted as a movie about two cold realists can possibly be." For heartfelt eulogies, check out the obituary penned by Susan Wloszcyzyna at RogerEbert.com, as well as Hadley Freeman’s remembrance at The Guardian. For guaranteed laughs, check out the clip embedded below of Marshall in an unforgettable excerpt from Albert Brooks' 1985 classic, "Lost in America," a scene that Ebert claimed was the best in the movie. It's hard not to agree with him.

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#280 July 12, 2016

Matt writes: Abbas Kiarostami, who passed away July 4th at age 76, was one of the great masters of the cinematic art form. I'll never forget the experience of watching his 1990 landmark, "Close-Up," in its pristine Criterion edition, or becoming entranced by his 2010 masterwork, "Certified Copy," when I first saw it on the big screen. Patrick Z. McGavin wrote a beautiful tribute to Kiarostami, as did Godfrey Cheshire, who reflected on his friendship with the icon. Various staff members at RogerEbert.com also pitched in to offer their own remembrances in a lovely multi-voice piece. 

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#279 June 28, 2016

Sheila writes: Terrence Malick has spent his career capturing the beauty of waving treetops, sunsets, reflections on water, shadows and sunlight. Vugar Efendi has put together a beautiful and hypnotic video, weaving together the natural scenes in Malick’s films.

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#278 June 14, 2016

Matt writes: Hello, Ebert Club subscribers! I'm Matt Fagerholm, Assistant Editor at RogerEbert.com, and I'll be taking over the Ebert Club newsletter. My inimitable predecessor, Sheila O'Malley, has gotten me up to speed on what you'll be expecting from this membership, and I'm very excited to provide you with a sneak peek at some of the most enticing titles in both current and classic cinema.

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#276 May 17, 2016

Sheila writes: The Cannes Film Festival is up and running and Rogerebert.com is there! You can check out Rogerebert.com's full coverage in the Table of Contents for the film festival. That post will be updated as more dispatches come in. There is video footage as well, including a memorable moment when Chaz Ebert asked a question at the "Money Monster" press conference. Finally, "Two Weeks in the Midday Sun," Roger Ebert's 1987 book about the Cannes Film Festival, was re-released in May, just in time for the 2016 festival. The re-release has a foreword written by Martin Scorsese, which you can read here.

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