In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

RogerEbert.com

Thumb wild rose poster

Wild Rose

Wild Rose may sound like a familiar tune, but you’ve never heard it performed quite like this.

Thumb childs poster

Child's Play

Nastier, more playful, and just as good if not better than the original film.

Other Reviews
Review Archives
Thumb xbepftvyieurxopaxyzgtgtkwgw

Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

Other Reviews
Great Movie Archives
Other Articles
Blog Archives

Cast and Crew

* This filmography is not intended to be a comprehensive list of this artist’s work. Instead it reflects the films this person has been involved with that have been reviewed on this site.

#352 April 16, 2019

Matt writes: The 21st annual edition of Roger Ebert's Film Festival (a.k.a. Ebertfest), concluded last Saturday, and you can find all the onstage Q&As embedded in our festival coverage. Brian Tallerico covered the opening night screening of "Amazing Grace," while Nick Allen covered the Day 2 panels ("Challenging Stigma Through the Arts" and "Women in Cinema") and screenings ("Coeur Fidele," "Rachel Getting Married" and "Bound," culminating in an unforgettable Q&A with Jennifer Tilly and Gina Gershon). Peter Sobczynski covered Day 3 of the festival ("Sebastian," "Cold War," "Cane River," "A Year of the Quiet Sun" and "Romy and Michele's High School Reunion"), and Nick did the write-up for Day 4 ("Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise," "Won't You Be My Neighbor?", "Almost Famous" and "Sideways"). The 2018-19 University of Illinois College of Media Roger Ebert Fellows, Curtis Cook, Pari Apostolakos and Eunice Alpasan, also contributed their own dispatches.

Continue reading →

Alfre Woodard's `Delta' not black and white

It started like this. We were talking about her new film "Down in the Delta," where Alfre Woodard plays a hard-drinking woman from the Chicago projects who gets a fresh start on her uncle's farm in the Mississippi Delta. It is a good film, strong and touching, the directorial debut of the writer Maya Angelou. It opens Christmas Day. I said to Woodard, "You've never really made yourself available for exploitation, have you?"

Continue reading →

A critic's ordeal

TORONTO -- We are a little past the halfway point of the 23rd Toronto Film Festival, and my colleagues are looking more hollow-eyed and gaunt than usual. It is a strange occupation, going to three or four movies a day, and critics begin to resemble fishlike creatures from unlit caverns. This year is worse than usual, because the facilities are better.

Continue reading →