In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

RogerEbert.com

Thumb feegmvmhwfot6wdiu0ymsxzyz12

Judy

Try as she might, Zellweger’s Judy never goes beyond an impression of the multi-talented artist; her all-caps version of acting failing to allow the role…

Thumb uoaqjg7zsmftnbgokupu1yszqu0

Dolemite Is My Name

Dolemite is My Name is a typical biopic buoyed by its unrelenting hilarity, its affection for its subject and commitment to the time and place…

Other Reviews
Review Archives
Thumb xbepftvyieurxopaxyzgtgtkwgw

Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

Other Reviews
Great Movie Archives
Other Articles
Blog Archives
Primary apcannes thumb 600x454 10819

QT, the critics, the 'fanboys' and the best movies ever

From a Quentin Tarantino interview with Ella Taylor in the Village Voice:

Film criticism is in a strange place. Talk about 17 years later! [After "Reservoir Dogs."] I could never have imagined that print film reviewing would be dying. It's unfathomable to me. I don't like reading film criticism on a laptop. I like holding it in my hand.

You're a geezer, Quentin.

Exactly. It seems to me from reading a lot of the film criticism that came out of Cannes this year that the few print critics that are left writing are so busy combating these Internet bozos that there's a new formalism, a new self-seriousness among remaining critics, to prove they're professionals. Even some of the younger critics who are still writing in print--well, they're not that young--are coming across like young fogies. There are some good online critics, but then there's these fanboy types: "Ooh, this sucks balls." It's a little bit like '78, '79, '80, where exuberance in filmmaking is not getting its due anymore. For example, "The Blues Brothers" never got any respect. Now, it truly is beloved, as it goddamn well should be. I mean, it's sad to think of what happened to John Landis after "An American Werewolf in London," but in those two movies, he was the first fanboy director making movies out of his head.

Advertisement

And, regarding his favorite movies of all time in life:

I can tell you now. This got picked up on from [your] piece [17 years ago] for the next five years, those top three in particular: "Taxi Driver," "Blow Out," and "Rio Bravo." I've changed. I know I was cagey about it before, but my favorite movie of all time is "The Good, the Bad and the Ugly." That's the best movie ever made. I can't even imagine myself doing better; that's how much I love it. I would also throw "His Girl Friday" in there. The fifth will always be however I feel at the moment. So I'll throw in "Carrie," give De Palma a shout-out.

(Above: Tarantino dances up the red carpet at Cannes, 2009. AP photo.)

Popular Blog Posts

Ebert's Most Hated

EDITOR'S NOTE: Sometimes, Roger Ebert is exposed to bad movies. When that happens, it is his duty -- if not necessari...

Netflix’s The I-Land is Almost So Bad That You Should Watch It

A review of Netflix's The I-Land, the worst show in the streaming service's history.

Who do you read? Good Roger, or Bad Roger?

This message came to me from a reader named Peter Svensland. He and a fr...

TIFF 2019: Bad Education, A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, Hearts and Bones

On three films from TIFF that all feature journalists, and that are all good!

Reveal Comments
comments powered by Disqus