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I Lost My Body

A visually sumptuous slice of macabre storytelling that works best when it uses its director’s magical sense of composition and less when it feels weighed…

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Great Movie Archives

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Matt Zoller Seitz

Matt Zoller Seitz

Matt Zoller Seitz is the Editor at Large of RogerEbert.com. He is also the TV critic for New York Magazine and Vulture.com, and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in criticism. His writing on film and television has appeared in The New York Times, Salon.com, The New Republic and Sight and Sound. Seitz is the founder and original editor of the influential film blog The House Next Door, now a part of Slant Magazine, and the co-founder and original editor of Press Play, an IndieWire blog of film and TV criticism and video essays.


A Brooklyn-based writer and filmmaker, Seitz has written, narrated, edited or produced over a hundred hours’ worth of video essays about cinema history and style for The Museum of the Moving Image, Salon.com and Vulture, among other outlets. His five-part 2009 video essay Wes Anderson: The Substance of Style was spun off into the hardcover book The Wes Anderson Collection. This book and its follow-up, The Wes Anderson Collection: Grand Budapest Hotel were New York Times bestsellers. 


Other Seitz books include Mad Men Carousel: The Complete Critical Companion, The Oliver Stone Experience, and TV (The Book). He is currently working on a novel, a children's film, and a book about the history of horror, co-authored with RogerEbert.com contributor Simon Abrams.

Recent reviews

Mickey and the Bear
Klaus
Motherless Brooklyn
The Irishman

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Mickey and the Bear

(2019)

Klaus

(2019)

Motherless Brooklyn

(2019)

The Irishman

(2019)

The Kill Team

(2019)

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil

(2019)

The Gift: The Journey of Johnny Cash

(2019)

Memory: The Origins of Alien

(2019)

Where's My Roy Cohn?

(2019)

Downton Abbey

(2019)

Moonlight Sonata: Deafness in Three Movements

(2019)

Strange But True

(2019)

Raise Hell: The Life & Times of Molly Ivins

(2019)

Friedkin Uncut

(2019)

The Angry Birds Movie 2

(2019)

The Kitchen

(2019)

After the Wedding

(2019)

Them That Follow

(2019)

The Lion King

(2019)

Armstrong

(2019)

Sword of Trust

(2019)

Three Peaks

(2019)

Toy Story 4

(2019)

The Dead Don't Die

(2019)

Smile When You Say That: Joker's Last Laugh

As of this writing, Todd Phillips’ “Joker" has earned nearly $1 billion globally, making it one of the most successful comic book movies ever released. But the discourse surrounding it will outlive this moment. No comic book-derived film since "Black Panther " has sparked more commentary, although the discussion surrounding this one has been more oppositional than anything else, and clouded by bad faith on every side. 

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30 Minutes on "Not Fade Away"

The first theatrical feature film written and directed by David Chase, the creator of “The Sopranos,” this is an autobiographical tale about the formation of an artistic sensibility. John Magaro plays Doug Damiano, a northern New Jersey teenager whose father Pat (James Gandolfini) is a hot-tempered Archie Bunker-style reactionary who suffers from psoriasis, and whose mother Antoinette (Molly Price) is a depressive who regularly threatens to kill herself. The movie is narrated by Doug’s sister Evelyn, played by Meg Guzulescu, in the manner of a third-person novel, packing a television season’s worth of incident into an hour and 50 minutes yet somehow never feeling rushed. 

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30 Minutes on: "Crawl"

When I was a college student in Dallas in the 1980s, my favorite theater was the Big Town, which showed second-run movies for a dollar. It was located in a small, run-down mall that probably hadn’t been thriving for 10 years. By the time I started going there, there were potholes and canyon-sized cracks in the parking lot that were never going to be fixed, so you just made a mental note to drive around them. Most of the storefronts were boarded up, and the handful of spaces that were occupied were Mom and Pop businesses. There were people in the parking lot on the way in selling churros and pralines and BBQ they’d cooked in the backs of pickup trucks. One time a chicken got loose and ran through the mall. Kids chased it like it was Rocky Balboa in a training montage.

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