In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

RogerEbert.com

Thumb dead die poster

The Dead Don't Die

A leisurely film about the end of the world, with flesh-eating and lots of jokes and a few moments of eerie beauty.

Thumb kq5gikhhdfa9xcbv6bnkon6u6ua

I Will Follow

This review was originally published on March 8, 2011 and is being republished for Roger's birthday."I Will Follow" doesn't tell a story so much as try…

Other Reviews
Review Archives
Thumb 9ws8u2yx0e5nxl6qnovrh1l0r1p

A Woman Under the Influence

This review was originally published on January 14, 1988 and is being republished for Roger's birthday.John Cassavetes is one of the few modern directors whose…

Other Reviews
Great Movie Archives

Cast and Crew

* This filmography is not intended to be a comprehensive list of this artist’s work. Instead it reflects the films this person has been involved with that have been reviewed on this site.

Ebertfest 2017: "Hair" and "Being There"

Primary 671722018

Reviews and screenings of "Hair" and "Being There" at Ebertfest 2017, and Q&A with producers Michael Butler and Michael Hausman by Michael Phillips, Nate Kohn and Chaz Ebert; and with Oscar-nominated Caleb Deschanel by Simon Kilmurry and Scott Mantz.

Continue reading →

#88 November 9, 2011

The Grand Poobah writes: Unless we find an angel, our television program will go off the air at the end of its current season. There. I've said it. Usually in television, people use evasive language. Not me. We'll be gone. I want to be honest about why this is. We can't afford to finance it any longer.

To read the full story, visit "The Chimes at midnight" on the Blog.

Continue reading →

#87 November 2, 2011

Marie writes: It occurred to me that I've never actually told members about the Old Vic Tunnels.  Instead, I've shared news of various exhibits held inside them, like the recent Minotaur. So I'm going to fix that and take you on a tour!  (click image to enlarge.)

Continue reading →

A man with inklings of a soul

The 60s were a rough transition for America. Major shifts seemed to be occurring in every fabric of society from civil rights to sexual mores. The worsening course of the Vietnam war fueled distrust in political institutions. Women's rights highlighted a breaking from oppressive traditions. The old seemed to be fading away more radically than ever before.

Like the era it was made in, "Hud" was a key shift. As film critic Emmanuel Levy correctly puts it, it is "a transitional film between the naive films of the early 60s and the more cynical ones later in the decade." Though it plays as a compelling drama of small town life and family tribulation, through its lens of father-son conflict, it also captures the angst in the loss of authority, the gap between of two different generations, and an elegy for the good ole' days.

Continue reading →