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Resistance

Jakubowicz handles these threads with coherence and vigor.

The Scheme

There may be no March Madness this year but there’s something truly insane related to college basketball this Tuesday.

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Great Movie Archives

The Unloved, Part 19: "The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford"

"If there is any movie that makes literal the killing of your former self and the acceptance of your permanent self, it's this," says Scout Tafoya in reference to Andrew Dominik's acclaimed yet sorely under-loved 2007 masterwork, "The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford," which is the focus of this nineteenth installment in the Unloved series. Declaring it as the "most visually beautiful film of the last 30 years" (kudos to twelve-time Oscar-nominee Roger Deakins), Tafoya discusses the profound impact the film has had on his own life, upon turning 26. He also explores the film's complex character dynamics, rich performances and haunting dialogue, while building a convincing case for the picture's emerging status as a great American classic. Find more "Unloved" video essays here.

The Unloved - The Assassination of Jesse James By The Coward Robert Ford from Scout Tafoya on Vimeo.

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