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Dolittle

A wild whirlwind of a mess, without any coherence, without even a guiding principle.

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Matt Zoller Seitz

Matt Zoller Seitz

Matt Zoller Seitz is the Editor at Large of RogerEbert.com. He is also the TV critic for New York Magazine and Vulture.com, and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in criticism. His writing on film and television has appeared in The New York Times, Salon.com, The New Republic and Sight and Sound. Seitz is the founder and original editor of the influential film blog The House Next Door, now a part of Slant Magazine, and the co-founder and original editor of Press Play, an IndieWire blog of film and TV criticism and video essays.


A Brooklyn-based writer and filmmaker, Seitz has written, narrated, edited or produced over a hundred hours’ worth of video essays about cinema history and style for The Museum of the Moving Image, Salon.com and Vulture, among other outlets. His five-part 2009 video essay Wes Anderson: The Substance of Style was spun off into the hardcover book The Wes Anderson Collection. This book and its follow-up, The Wes Anderson Collection: Grand Budapest Hotel were New York Times bestsellers. 


Other Seitz books include Mad Men Carousel: The Complete Critical Companion, The Oliver Stone Experience, and TV (The Book). He is currently working on a novel, a children's film, and a book about the history of horror, co-authored with RogerEbert.com contributor Simon Abrams.

Recent reviews

A Hidden Life
Midnight Family
A Million Little Pieces
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4.0
A Hidden Life

(2019)

Midnight Family

(2019)

A Million Little Pieces

(2019)

63 Up

Varda by Agnès

(2019)

Dark Waters

(2019)

Mickey and the Bear

(2019)

Klaus

(2019)

Motherless Brooklyn

(2019)

The Irishman

(2019)

The Kill Team

(2019)

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil

(2019)

The Gift: The Journey of Johnny Cash

(2019)

Memory: The Origins of Alien

(2019)

Where's My Roy Cohn?

(2019)

Downton Abbey

(2019)

Moonlight Sonata: Deafness in Three Movements

(2019)

Strange But True

(2019)

Raise Hell: The Life & Times of Molly Ivins

(2019)

Friedkin Uncut

(2019)

The Angry Birds Movie 2

(2019)

The Kitchen

(2019)

After the Wedding

(2019)

Them That Follow

(2019)

In a heartbeat: "28 Days Later" revisited

"28 Days Later" might be one of my favorite films. It's not as politically or satirically ambitious as George Romero's zombie pictures, but as a visionary piece of pure cinema—a film that, to paraphrase Roger, is more about how it's about things than what it's about—I think it's unbeatable. A classic.

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A house made of candy: On "Despicable Me 2," slapstick and single parenthood

I won't make any grand claims for the "Despicable Me" films as art, but I adore them anyway. There's something appealingly relaxed and confident about them. They don't quite look, move or feel like any other blockbuster animated cartoons, yet they never seem to be trying too hard. And they're the best portrait of single parenthood I've seen outside of "Louie."

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Cut to Black: "The Sopranos" and the Future of TV Drama: Table of Contents

Table of contents for "Cut to Black," a discussion of The Sopranos' ending and the future of TV drama; contains links to all six episodes, plus transcripts. Participants include RogerEbert.com editor and New York Magazine critic Matt Zoller Seitz, Huffington Post TV critic Maureen Ryan, A.V. Club TV critic Ryan McGee, and previously.tv contributor Sarah D. Bunting. And yes, they do get into whether Tony got whacked.

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Cut to Black: "The Sopranos" and the Future of TV Drama, Part 6

Part 6 of "Cut to Black," a videotaped roundtable discussion about the end of The Sopranos and the future of television drama. Participants include RogerEbert.com editor and New York Magazine critic Matt Zoller Seitz, Huffington Post TV critic Maureen Ryan, A.V. Club TV critic Ryan McGee, and previously.tv contributor Sarah D. Bunting. The program was shot and edited by Dave Bunting, Jr.

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Cut to Black: "The Sopranos" and the Future of TV Drama, Part 5

Part 5 of "Cut to Black," a videotaped roundtable discussion about the end of The Sopranos and the future of television drama. Participants include RogerEbert.com editor and New York Magazine TV critic Matt Zoller Seitz, Huffington Post TV critic Maureen Ryan, A.V. Club TV critic Ryan McGee, and previously.tv contributor Sarah D. Bunting. Shot and edited by Dave Bunting, Jr.

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Cut to Black: "The Sopranos" and the Future of TV Drama, Part 4

Part 4 of "Cut to Black," a videotaped roundtable discussion about the end of The Sopranos and the future of television drama. Participants include RogerEbert.com editor and New York Magazine TV critic Matt Zoller Seitz, Huffington Post TV critic Maureen Ryan, A.V. Club TV critic Ryan McGee, and previously.tv contributor Sarah D. Bunting. Shot and edited by Dave Bunting, Jr.

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Cut to Black: "The Sopranos" and the Future of TV Drama, Part 3

Part 3 of "Cut to Black," a videotaped roundtable discussion about the end of The Sopranos and the future of television drama. Participants include RogerEbert.com editor and New York Magazine TV critic Matt Zoller Seitz, Huffington Post TV critic Maureen Ryan, A.V. Club TV critic Ryan McGee, and previously.tv contributor Sarah D. Bunting. Shot and edited by Dave Bunting, Jr.

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Cut to Black: "The Sopranos" and the Future of TV Drama, Part 2

Part 2 of "Cut to Black," a videotaped roundtable discussion about the end of The Sopranos and the future of television drama. This is the "Did Tony get whacked?" episode, in case you're wondering. Participants include RogerEbert.com editor and New York Magazine TV critic Matt Zoller Seitz, Huffington Post TV critic Maureen Ryan, A.V. Club TV critic Ryan McGee, and previously.tv contributor Sarah D. Bunting. Shot and edited by Dave Bunting, Jr.

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