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Richard Jewell

Eastwood’s conceptions of heroism and villainy have always been, if not endlessly complex, at least never simplistic.

6 Underground

It becomes repetitive, nonsensical, and just loud after everyone gets an origin story and we're left with nothing to do but go boom.

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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In Wyoming, a meeting between the NAACP and the KKK

In Casper, Wyoming, Jeremy Fugelberg of the Casper Star-Tribune has a remarkable story on an unlikely meeting. Jimmy Simmons, president of the Casper, Wyoming, chapter of the NAACP, met with John Abarr, an organizer for the United Klans of America. Yes, the KKK. It's clear, compelling reporting.

Just a sample:

Abarr makes a point of proving he’s a member of anti-racism groups. Membership: American Civil Liberties Union, the hate-group watchdog Southern Poverty Law Center, and oh, yes — also the United Klans of America, an organization with a website image gallery that includes a target with an Obama campaign symbol bull’s-eye.

Then there’s the desire to secede from the United States of America. The northwest U.S. — Wyoming, Montana, Idaho, Washington, Oregon — should secede and form a territory. Blacks can stay there, he supposes, but no more should be allowed in, to keep the region white. States such as Georgia, which are primarily black, should secede from the union and become a black state.

It's worth reading the whole story.

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