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Office Christmas Party

Another reminder that allowing your cast to madly improvise instead of actually providing a coherent script with a scintilla of inherent logic often leads to…

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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The Unloved, Part 24: "Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows"

In the 24th edition of his series "The Unloved," video essayist Scout Tafoya ventures back to what he considers to be the best year of film, 2011. A set of 12 months that brought cinema the likes of "The Tree of Life," "Hugo" and "Drive," it also contains a derided blockbuster that Tafoya holds close to heart and memory, Guy Ritchie's "Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows." In this celebration of the visually intricate, friendship-fueled action film, Tafoya contextualizes the film as both influenced by the likes of "Battleship Potemkin"/Soviet montage and Futurism, while also standing as an example of CG filmmaking's potential when mixed with cinema's basic instruments. At the end, Tafoya reveals a personal significance within "Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows," recalling the cosmic adoration we all have for particular films, as directly connected to the times in our lives in which we see them. 

Click here for more "Unloved" videos.

Sequence 1-Game of Shadows-Carax from Scout Tafoya on Vimeo.

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