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Outbreak

The thriller occupies the same territory as countless science fiction movies about deadly invasions and high-tech conspiracies, but has been made with intelligence and an…

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Planes, Trains and Automobiles

It is perfectly cast and soundly constructed, and all else flows naturally. Steve Martin and John Candy don't play characters; they embody themselves.

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Great Movie Archives

The media made them superstars

"Awake in the Dark: The Best of Roger Ebert," assembles the essential writings of the Chicago Sun-Times film critic in a single volume for the first time. "Awake in the Dark" surveys his 40-year catalog, including reviews, essays and interviews. For the next five weeks we'll publish excerpts here from the collection's highlights in each decade, from the '60s to the '00s. This week: "Bonnie and Clyde" (1967)

"Bonnie and Clyde" is a milestone in the history of American movies, a work of truth and brilliance. It is also pitilessly cruel, filled with sympathy, nauseating, funny, heartbreaking and astonishingly beautiful. If it does not seem that those words should be strung together, perhaps that is because movies do not very often reflect the full range of human life.

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