In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

RogerEbert.com

Ad Astra

This is rare, nuanced storytelling, anchored by one of Brad Pitt’s career-best performances and remarkable technical elements on every level. It’s a special film.

Where's My Roy Cohn?

"Homosexuals have AIDS. I have liver cancer." That corrosive line from Tony Kusher's acclaimed play "Angels in America" is delivered by the character of Roy Cohn,…

Other reviews
Review Archives

Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

Other reviews
Great Movie Archives
Other articles
Blog Archives

Reviews

If He Hollers, Let Him Go!

  |  

"If He Hollers, Let Him Go!" is trash. That it should be playing in a reputable first-run theater is astonishing; apparently it opened downtown because it has two cheaply exploited angles: nudity and racism. The ads make a lot of both.

I say racism, not race. Although this film features black actors in starring roles, It does not in any sense treat those actors with dignity or even decency. The distinguished black actor Raymond St. Jacques is forced to act in situations and mouth lines which must have caused him untold mental suffering.

The plot is insulting garbage. The story panders in prejudice, deliberately exploiting black-white tensions with a series of scenes in which characters pound, gouge and kick each other bloody. This is an evil film, a dishonest film, an ugly film.

Advertisement

Popular Blog Posts

Netflix’s The I-Land is Almost So Bad That You Should Watch It

A review of Netflix's The I-Land, the worst show in the streaming service's history.

Ebert's Most Hated

EDITOR'S NOTE: Sometimes, Roger Ebert is exposed to bad movies. When that happens, it is his duty -- if not necessari...

Who do you read? Good Roger, or Bad Roger?

This message came to me from a reader named Peter Svensland. He and a fr...

Venice 2019: Roman Polanski's J’Accuse

A review of the new film by Roman Polanski, which premiered at the Venice Film Festival.

Reveal Comments
comments powered by Disqus