In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

RogerEbert.com

Thumb wildlife

Wildlife

One never senses judgment from Dano, Kazan, Gyllenhaal, or Mulligan—they recognize that there’s beauty even in the mistakes we make in life. It’s what makes…

Thumb halloween poster

Halloween

Do you know the biggest sin of the new Halloween? It’s just not scary. And that’s one thing you could never say about the original.

Other Reviews
Review Archives
Thumb xbepftvyieurxopaxyzgtgtkwgw

Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

Other Reviews
Great Movie Archives
Primary img 0010

Obit for Imogene James

This obituary for Imogene James, mother of "Hoop Dreams" and "Life Itself" director Steve James, was originally posted April 2nd at the Daily Press website. Steve wrote the obit himself.

HAMPTON - Imogene Miller Mont James, 90, was a vitally original and beloved mother and wife to her family, and treasured resident of Hampton where she lived for over sixty years. She was known to all as "Imo" or "Mo" and indeed her sense of humor would have put her in good company with Larry and Curly. She was the daughter of Grace Miller and Walter Mont in Frostburg, MD, a small town, which she regularly insisted, over protests, that her kids and husband visit on family vacations. 

Advertisement

From her early days as a stellar high school student and math whiz, she moved on to being a beautiful and single OB-GYN nurse in Washington D.C. That is, until she met dashing young Bill James of Hampton, a former high school and college football star. Their mutual love of sports cemented their bond, and they were married in 1950. From there, a steady stream of precociously talented children followed - at least in their parents' estimation: Sharon, Randy, Steven, and Richard. An early rupture in the marriage - Bill was a Colts fan, Mo a Redskins fan - was not fatal. Perhaps because they bonded over a profound and everlasting love for Virginia Tech, where Bill, Sharon, Randy, and Richard attended. (We won't discuss Steven's choice.) 

To help pay college tuitions, Mo became a school nurse. At the advent of integration, she volunteered to be the first school nurse at Pembroke High School - the former Phoenix High - when other school nurses declined out of fear. She thus became the first school nurse in the history of that school and was much beloved by all students, black and white. Up until nearly the day of her passing, former students would often seek her out to say hello and talk of their fond memories of those days. (Her family concluded she must have been easy to trick into getting a sick pass to miss class.) In her later years she became ever more devoted to golfing with her buddies, gardening, her Hokies, her church, and to telling endlessly embarrassing stories about her children. A generous person and spirited raconteur to the end, she will be greatly missed by her family and all whose lives she touched. 

Imogene passed away on Tuesday, March 31, 2015. She is survived by her daughter Sharon; son Randy; and his wife Jenny and their daughter Madison; son Steven, his wife Judy, and their children Dylan, Corin, and Jackson; son Richard, his wife Debra, and their sons Benjamin and Adam; and brother-in-law Philip James. A funeral service will be conducted at 2:00 pm on Friday April 3rd at First United Methodist Church, 110 E. Queen, Hampton. Family will receive friends Thursday, from 5-7:00 pm at R. Hayden Smith Funeral Home, 245 S. Armistead Ave., Hampton. Private internment will be held in Parklawn Cemetery, Hampton.

Advertisement

Popular Blog Posts

Who do you read? Good Roger, or Bad Roger?

This message came to me from a reader named Peter Svensland. He and a fr...

Netflix’s Terrifying, Moving The Haunting of Hill House is Essential Viewing

A review of Mike Flanagan's new horror series based on the Shirley Jackson novel, The Haunting of Hill House.

Always Leave 'Em Laughing: Peter Bogdanovich on Buster Keaton, superheroes, television, and the effect of time on movies

Peter Bogdanovich, film historian and filmmaker, talks about Buster Keaton, the subject of his new documentary.

Why The Godfather, Part II is the Best of the Trilogy

A look back at one of the best films of all time.

Reveal Comments
comments powered by Disqus