In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

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The Water Diviner

Russell Crowe's directorial debut, a drama about a man trying to save three sons who disappeared at the battle of Galliipoli, wants to be a…

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The Age of Adaline

Though it's hampered by rather bloodless lead performances, this story of an ageless woman and her two great loves finds its tone in its second…

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

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My Favorite Roger: Scott Jordan Harris

"Bonnie and Clyde"

Why did I choose this review?

Roger Ebert’s film criticism was brilliant from the beginning. His piece on "Bonnie and Clyde" was written in 1967, his first year as a film critic, and is his key early review. While other critics detested the film and would later have to admit they'd been blind to the beauty of a masterpiece, Roger instantly recognized it as something major that foretold a change in the way movies would be made. In announcing its virtuosity, he announced his own. His review of "Bonnie and Clyde" is a milestone in the history of American movie reviews, a work of truth and brilliance.

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