In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

RogerEbert.com

Thumb_mv5bmtq1mze4mte3of5bml5banbnxkftztgwotcyndm3nte_._v1__sx1216_sy640_

Amy

Sometimes, it feels as if we are eavesdropping on day-to-day conversations rather than just hearing the usual litany of platitudes and regrets.

Thumb_large_nxcfdsanskih09xq74fjnyhw4g0

Stray Dog

"Stray Dog" largely succeeds because Granik's technique complements her subject. Both he and the film are modest in their goals and cherish the value of…

Other Reviews
Review Archives
Thumb_xbepftvyieurxopaxyzgtgtkwgw

Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

Thumb_jrluxpegcv11ostmz1fqha1bkxq

Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

Other Reviews
Great Movie Archives
Other Articles
Channel Archives
Primary_eb20060327filmfestivals603280301ar

Classic flicks under the stars

The seventh annual Outdoor Film Festival in Grant Park will open with James Dean as a rebel without a cause, and end with Ferris Bueller as a rebel with one. The series of seven free Tuesday evening screenings, which draw crowds upward of 14,000, unspools starting July 18 at Butler Field, Monroe and South Lake Shore. The schedule of this year's festival, which is presented by the Mayor's Office of Special Events, Commonwealth Edison, the Chicago Park District and the Chicago Film Office, was released today.

I will join fellow critic and Sun-Times columnist Richard Roeper in introducing the opening-night screening of "Rebel Without a Cause" (1955), starring James Dean and Natalie Wood. We'll talk about 8:15 p.m.; the movie will start at 8:55. All screenings will begin at dusk, which grows gradually earlier as the festival progresses. Prime positions on the lawn start filling up an hour or more before, as movie buffs stake out their turf, spread their blankets and unpack their snacks.

The rest of the festival:

July 25: "Bringing Up Baby" (1938, Howard Hawks), with Cary Grant and Katharine Hepburn. Approximate start time, 8:49 p.m.

Aug. 1: "High Noon," (1952, Fred Zinnemann), with Gary Cooper and Grace Kelly. 8:41 p.m.

Aug. 8: "American Graffiti" (1973, George Lucas), with Richard Dreyfuss, Ron Howard and Cindy Williams. 8:32 p.m.

Aug. 15: "The Apartment" (1960, Billy Wilder), with Jack Lemmon, Shirley MacLaine and Fred MacMurray. 8:22 p.m.

Aug. 22: "On the Waterfront" (1954, Elia Kazan), with Marlon Brando, Karl Malden, Rod Steiger and Eva Marie Saint. 8:11 p.m.

Aug. 29: "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" (1986, John Hughes), with Matthew Broderick, Alan Ruck and Mia Sara. 7:59 p.m.

There is free bicycle valet parking at the northwest corner of Lake Shore and Monroe. No bikes, dogs or booze are allowed in the seating area.

Public transportation is a quick way to get there; parking is available at the Millennium Park, and the East Monroe and Grant Park North and South parking garages.

State-of-the-art projection and sound facilities are masterminded by Chicago's world-famous technical wizard James Bond.

Popular Blog Posts

Why Can't Sad Be Fat?

A rebuttal to Joni Edelman's piece on "Inside Out."

Sex Symbol Without Auteur: The Strange Case of the Gina Lollobrigida Filmography

Three films starring Gina Lollobrigida have been released on Blu-ray; Glenn Kenny looks at them and her entire career.

“Scream” and “Zoo” Seek to Raise the Summer TV Body Count

MTV's Scream and CBS's Zoo premiere tonight. One is worth your time. Which one?

The Unloved, Part 19: "The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford"

The July 2015 edition of The Unloved looks at Andrew Dominik's "The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert...

Reveal Comments
comments powered by Disqus