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Jackie

There are two movies in "Jackie." One of these movies is just OK. The other is exceptional. The first one keeps undermining the second.

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Things to Come

Things to Come is the detailed tapestry of one woman’s life, as she moves through an important transition.

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Martin Scorsese's "Taxi Driver" Returns to Theaters for Two Nights Only

For its 40th anniversary, Martin Scorsese’s “Taxi Driver” is returning to the big screen for two nights only. On Sunday, October 16 and Wednesday, October 19, a digital presentation of the classic will be followed by a special Q&A recorded at the the 2016 Tribeca Film Festival, which included Scorsese, Robert De Niro, Jodie Foster and many others. This rare occasion to see “Taxi Driver” on the big screen, the absolute best way to experience it, will be happening at theaters across the country courtesy of Fathom Events. 

In Roger’s Great Movies essay on the film, he wrote about the power of Scorsese’s film, especially in multiple viewings: 

"The film can be seen as a series of his failed attempts to connect, every one of them hopelessly wrong. He asks a girl out on a date, and takes her to a porno movie. He sucks up to a political candidate, and ends by alarming him. He tries to make small talk with a Secret Service agent. He wants to befriend a child prostitute, but scares her away. He is so lonely that when he asks, "Who you talkin' to?" he is addressing himself in a mirror.

This utter aloneness is at the center of "Taxi Driver," one of the best and most powerful of all films, and perhaps it is why so many people connect with it even though Travis Bickle would seem to be the most alienating of movie heroes. We have all felt as alone as Travis. Most of us are better at dealing with it. 

["Taxi Driver"] is a film that does not grow dated, or overfamiliar. I have seen it dozens of times. Each time I see it, it works; I am drawn into Travis' underworld of alienation, loneliness, haplessness and anger."


For more information about the Fathom Events screening of "Taxi Driver," and to buy tickets, click here.

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