In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

RogerEbert.com

A Hidden Life

It’s one of the year’s best and most distinctive movies, though sure to be divisive, even alienating for some viewers, in the manner of nearly…

Bombshell

Bombshell is both light on its feet and a punch in the gut.

Other reviews
Review Archives

Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

Other reviews
Great Movie Archives

A brief history of samurai

When: Friday through March 9 Where: Music Box Theatre, 3733 N. Southport Tickets: $8.25-$9.25 Call: (773) 871-6604

Samurai movies are a genre like the Western, often used to take a deep look at the society that produces them. They're not to be confused with routine martial arts or action thrillers, and that will be obvious starting Friday, as the Music Box showcases nine of the greatest samurai movies ever made. Many of them will screen in newly restored prints.

Consider Masaki Kobayashi's "Samurai Rebellion," which plays Friday and Saturday on a double feature with Kihachi Okamoto's "Kill!" A movie named "Samurai Rebellion" might sound like the last place you'd look for a film about the emergence of feminism and individuality in medieval Japan, but look again. When the lord of the district forces a family to accept his mistress as a bride, and then decides he wants her back again, both the woman and the family refuse to be obedient.

Advertisement

On Sunday and Monday, the double feature will be Kobayashi's "Harakiri" and Kihachi Okamoto's "Sword of Doom." On Tuesday, Hideo Gosha's "Three Outlaw Samurai" and Horoshi Inagaki's "Samurai Saga."

On Wednesday, Akira Kurosawa's "Yojimbo" and "Hidden Fortress." And next Thursday, the greatest of them all, Kurosawa's "The Seven Samurai."

I wrote a "Great Movie" review of "Samurai Rebellion," describing it as "a film of grace, beauty and fierce ethical debate, the story of a decision in favor of romance and against the samurai code."

That review is on rogerebert.com, along with my "Great Movie" reviews of "The Seven Samurai" ("not only a great film in its own right, but the source of a genre that would flow through the rest of the century") and "Yojimbo" ("Akira Kurosawa's most popular film in Japan ... a samurai aware that his time has passed and accepting with perfect equanimity whatever the new age has to offer").

Popular Blog Posts

The Ten Best Films of 2019

The best films of 2019, as chosen by the staff of RogerEbert.com.

Who do you read? Good Roger, or Bad Roger?

This message came to me from a reader named Peter Svensland. He and a fr...

Telluride 2019: Ford v. Ferrari, Uncut Gems, Marriage Story

A review of three premieres from Telluride.

The Best Television of the Decade

The top 50 shows of the 2010s.

Reveal Comments
comments powered by Disqus