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Crazy Rich Asians

Very few films have ever captured the pains of being first-generation American quite like Crazy Rich Asians.

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Sheila O'Malley

Sheila O'Malley

Sheila O'Malley received a BFA in Theatre from the University of Rhode Island and a Master's in Acting from the Actors Studio MFA Program. Along with Rogerebert.com, her work has also appeared in Film Comment, The Dissolve, Masters of Cinema, Movie Mezzanine, Flavorwire, Capital New York, Fandor, Press Play, and Bright Wall/Dark Room.  She has contributed video and print essays for various releases from The Criterion Collection. O’Malley wrote the narration (read by Angelina Jolie) for the Governors Awards Lifetime Achievement tribute reel to legendary actress Gena Rowlands. O’Malley also wrote the narration for the Governors Awards tribute to editor Anne Coates’, played at the 2016 Governors Awards. O’Malley writes about actors, movies, and Elvis Presley at her personal site, The Sheila Variations. A short film she wrote, "July and Half of August,” premiered at the 2016 Albuquerque Film and Music Experience.


Read her answers to our Movie Love Questionnaire here.


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#271 February 22, 2016

Sheila writes: A really fun piece over on Mubi: Adrian Curry, who heads up Mubi's popular movie-poster column, interviews Mondo creative director and poster-designer Jay Shaw. Shaw provides commentary for his Top Ten American Movie Posters. It's an eclectic selection. Some of the designs were not used, ultimately, like the Bill Gold design for "Get Carter" below, but still worthy of appreciation.

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#270 February 6, 2016

Sheila writes: The great Japanese animator Hayao Miyazaki has enthralled audiences for 40 years with his beautiful and sensitive films, filled with supernatural elements, dream-like images, and a vibrant sense of the small moments that make up human existence. Video-essayist Lewis Bond (you can view more of his work here) created a short documentary about Miyazaki called "Hayao Miyazaki: The Essence of Humanity." Here it is, in full. Enjoy!

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#269 January 24, 2016

Sheila writes: Many of you have probably already heard the exciting news that Guillermo Del Toro's stunning "Crimson Peak" has been chosen as the opening film of this year's Ebertfest (from April 13th, through Sunday, April 17th), with Del Toro attending as the honorary guest. Seeing "Crimson Peak", in all its visual splendor, on the gigantic screen at the Virginia Theater in Champaign, Illinois, will be thrilling. You can read more information here (with links to purchase Ebertfest passes). The other films that will play at Ebertfest have not been announced yet, but stay tuned!

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#268 January 7, 2016

Sheila writes: Happy New Year! In the wake of "Star Wars: The Force Awakens," I came across a video put together by violinist Taylor Davis, where she plays the famous themes from John Williams' original score, both "light" and "dark." Arranged, orchestrated and performed by Davis, it's a fun and rousing celebration of the possibilities inherent in that music. Have a look!

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#267 December 9, 2015

Sheila writes: Mike D'Angelo over at the A.V. Club has written a very interesting article called "What I learned from watching the first 10 minutes of 500 movies". He speaks of the challenge, as a film critic, to see as much as he can in any given year, not just the hits but the secondary films, the ones that don't generate any "buzz." In doing so, he started thinking about "the first 10 minutes" of films and how crucial they are. D'Angelo writes, "Basically, I give the movie 10 minutes to grab my attention. Most of them fail, and get turned off at that point. If I’m still interested, though, I’ll watch for another 10 minutes. There are two more potential bail-out points at 0:30 and 0:40; if I still want to keep going after 40 minutes, I commit to watching the entire film, even if it turns awful later." His essay has a lot of observations about screenwriting, first of all, but also the nuts-and-bolts of storytelling.

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#266 November 27, 2015

Sheila writes: To all the American readers of The Ebert Club, I hope you had a wonderful Thanksgiving! To spread a little joy, here is a glorious and fun "dance mash-up" of classic dance scenes from Hollywood films, to the soundtrack of "Uptown Funk." Mark Ronson was the superb editor, and he has noted that none of these clips have been sped up or slowed down to match the music. Beautifully done! Enjoy!

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