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A Walk Among the Tombstones

Fans of the hardboiled detective, rejoice. Screenwriter-director Scott Frank and actor Liam Neeson, adapting the splendid work of crime novelist Lawrence Block, have brought a…

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The Zero Theorem

Terry Gilliam's first science fiction film since "12 Monkeys" is an inventively designed but oddly inert satire on technology, God and the future of humankind.

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

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Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert became film critic of the Chicago Sun-Times in 1967. He is the only film critic with a star on Hollywood Boulevard Walk of Fame and was named honorary life member of the Directors' Guild of America. He won the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Screenwriters' Guild, and honorary degrees from the American Film Institute and the University of Colorado at Boulder. Since 1989 he has hosted Ebertfest, a film festival at the Virginia Theater in Champaign-Urbana. From 1975 until 2006 he, Gene Siskel and Richard Roeper co-hosted a weekly movie review program on national TV. He was Lecturer on Film for the University of Chicago extension program from 1970 until 2006, and recorded shot-by-shot commentaries for the DVDs of "Citizen Kane," "Casablanca," "Floating Weeds" and "Dark City," and has written over 20 books.

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Casino Royale

(1967)

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Africa Addio

(1967)

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Good Times

(1967)

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Hombre

(1967)

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Guns of the Trees

(1967)

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The Game Is Over

(1967)

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Clouds Over Israel

(1967)

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In Like Flint

(1967)

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Galia

(1967)

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Le Petit Soldat

(1960)

What was my Aunt Martha trying to ask me?

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After she had the heart attack out in Michigan on Thanksgiving 1988, I stood by her bedside in the recovery room and she tried so hard to tell me something, but it just didn't work. I loved her so much. Did she know how much? I never told her. There are always questions you wish you'd asked after it's too late to get an answer. Sometimes years can pass before you realize they're questions.

Everyone said I "took after her," and I did. My features are more rounded than anyone else on either side of my family. Martha R. Stumm was the youngest of six surviving children of a Dutch-Irish-German couple who raised their family on a farm outside Tayorville, Illinois. Years after after her father died and her mother opened a boarding house in Urbana, enough oil was found beneath the land to make it worth drilling.

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Siskel & Ebert review B-Rated movies. And C. And D...

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Marie writes: It's no secret how we feel about B-rated movie trailers inside the Ebert Club; there's nothing like a steaming pile of crap to inspire a good laugh. And it seems we're not alone. For behold: Siskel & Ebert and "The Stinkers of 1983". To enjoy even more amusing discoveries join the Club and explore a truly eclectic assortment of finds. Your subscription helps support the Newsletter, the Far-Flung Correspondents and the On-Demanders.

Go here to join the Ebert Club. Your subscription helps support the Ebert Club Newsletter, the Far-Flung Correspondents and The Demanders.

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I unwisely asked Marie Haws why it took so long for Snail Mail to reach her

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Marie is the Hon. Sec'y of The Ebert Club, and editor of our newsletter. As you can see, she communicates well in images.

Here is a free sample of The Ebert Club Newsletter. So hop on board, already.

Whenever you send me stuff in the mail, you always wonder why it takes so long. I live in a foreign country. :-) Otherwise, behold my physical mail box. Size of a shoe box, it can hold letters, flyers, DVD's, bubble envelopes, etc. Anything bigger than that, and you'll get a note from Canada Post to pick it up at the Mall, etc. When it's UPS or FEDX, they paste a sticker notice thing near your box so you'll see it. The building I live in was built circa 1973 and the style resembles Canadian architect Arthur Erickson, channeling Frank Lloyd Wright on Crack. LOL Wait till you see the "Mall".... it's a 19th century diorama. :-)

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We are so very, very, very small

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The graphic was created by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration to represent 1,235 planets we know to exist, and the suns they orbit. Each planet is a black dot. Our sun is below the top row at the right. It's estimated that millions of such planets exist in our galaxy alone.

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