In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”


The Handmaiden

A dazzling story of love, obsession, con artistry and revenge, directed by a modern master.


Jack Reacher: Never Go Back

It’s a pity that Jack Reacher: Never Go Back fails to support Cruise and his costars, all of whom are acting as if their lives…

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert became film critic of the Chicago Sun-Times in 1967. He is the only film critic with a star on Hollywood Boulevard Walk of Fame and was named honorary life member of the Directors' Guild of America. He won the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Screenwriters' Guild, and honorary degrees from the American Film Institute and the University of Colorado at Boulder. Since 1989 he has hosted Ebertfest, a film festival at the Virginia Theater in Champaign-Urbana. From 1975 until 2006 he, Gene Siskel and Richard Roeper co-hosted a weekly movie review program on national TV. He was Lecturer on Film for the University of Chicago extension program from 1970 until 2006, and recorded shot-by-shot commentaries for the DVDs of "Citizen Kane," "Casablanca," "Floating Weeds" and "Dark City," and has written over 20 books.

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Africa Addio


Good Times




Guns of the Trees


The Game Is Over


Clouds Over Israel


In Like Flint




Le Petit Soldat


Jonathan Rosenbaum at 70: A tribute


Three friends make a tribute to my own good friend and inspiration, Jonathan Rosenbaum. They write:

To celebrate a legendary critic's 70th birthday, two critic-filmmakers visit his home to create this intimate video present. Directed by Ignatiy Vishnevetsky. Produced by Kevin B. Lee for Fandor Keyframe. Special thanks to Ben Sachs (unintentionally not in the end credits).

Rosenbaum's Wikipedia entry, with his provocative "Alternative Top 100.

Go here for Rosenbaum's web site.

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My wife Chaz, the television personality


Note: This entry contains several high-quality embedded videos. It's necessary to give them time to load before attempting to view *any* of them.

Searching for mention of "Amour" on our 2012 PBS program "Ebert Presents at the Movies," I was pointed by Google to one of Chaz's video reports. I remembered liking her video at the time, started noodling through all of her reports, and found myself thinking of my wife's emerging role as a movie critic. For more than 20 years, she's attended virtually every film festival and press screening with me, debated the films, made friends with the people.

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Spielberg in 60 seconds

There's a story behind this little film that encapsulates the Far- Flung Correspondents of my website. A few years ago, I posted an early attempt at special effects by a Indian teenager named Krishna Shenoi. See below. He's the youngest of FFCs, and many of us were able to meet him at Ebertfest. He has since become a stellar student at a top Indian school, and has all the makings of a gifted profesional.

In 2011, I wrote:

Krishna Shenoi, an Indian teenager from Dubai by way of Bangalore, came with hismother Sandhya and sister Susmita:to Ebertfest. I'd seen his work on YouTube, and he's one of my Far-Flung Correspondents. I have a good feeling about Krishna. Re member his name. I suspect you may hear it again. I also suspect his sister, a medical student, may sometimes be his cinematographer.

Here is one of the first Shenoi videos I saw:

And about the next, from 2012, he told his fellow FFCs:

"This montage of my work over the last couple years, ranging from my films and animations to my books and paintings. Most of the work glimpsed here can be seen in its entirety on my website, .

"The song is "Weird Fishes/Arpeggi" from the album "In Rainbows," by Radiohead."

And here's the first look I had of Krishna's work, made when he was 14 years old! The photo below it captures the young director when he was still younger still.


Here;s the home page of my Far-Flung Correspondents.

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