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Heaven Is for Real

Faith-based film tries reaching past its audience, but falls back on preaching to its own choir way too much.

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

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Cash to benefit Katrina victims

CHICAGO -- To aid victims of Hurricane Katrina, a special preview screening of Twentieth Century Fox's "Walk the Line" will be hosted September 25th by film critics Roger Ebert and Richard Roeper. The film brings to life the story of the young Johnny Cash (Joaquin Phoenix) and his love affair with June Carter Cash (Reese Witherspoon).

The fund-raiser will be at 7 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 25th at the Gene Siskel Film Center, 164 N. State St.

Tickets are $100, and are available at TicketMaster outlets nationwide (or online at www.ticketmaster.com). Proceeds will go to the American Red Cross.

"The hurricane is an American tragedy, and we wanted to do something to help its victims," says Ebert. "This is a great opportunity for people to contribute funds that will go directly to the heart of this massive relief effort -- and to be among the first to see a film that doesn't open until November 18th, but is already garnering Oscar buzz," says Roeper.

For more information or to buy tickets, visit www.ebertandroeper.tv or www.ticketmaster.com.

-- PRNewswire

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