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Cartel Land

The film provides a fascinating, on-the-ground account of people struggling with situations that range from challenging to horrific.

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Stray Dog

"Stray Dog" largely succeeds because Granik's technique complements her subject. Both he and the film are modest in their goals and cherish the value of…

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

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Interview with Robert Radnitz

The boy is 11 or 12, and he lives on a sharecropper farm with his parents, his brother and his sister. His parents are people of enormous dignity and strength - qualities the white community did not prize among blacks in the Louisiana of 1930. But they attempt

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Interview with Simon Ward

It's said that Winston Churchill himself asked Carl Foreman to make a movie out of Churchill's "My Early Life." The great man made his request after seeing Foreman's "The Guns of Navarone." Now it may seem strange that the foremost statesman of his time would want his autobiography produced by a man who had just made a straightforward action picture. But then again, maybe not. We live in a time when people tend to do more or less the same thing all of their lives. Churchill did not. He had several careers before he settled into his final role as the World's Greatest Statesman. He spent quite a bit of his life, in fact, being an Eminent Failure. More than once, he committed what looked like political suicide. And his early life was filled with more action than thought. "You are my greatest disappointment," Lord Randolph Churchill rumbles at his son, somewhere around the middle of Foreman's "Young Winston." "I cannot imagine what will become of you." The audience is supposed to dig each other in the ribs at this moment, I suppose; our knowledge of how Churchill really turned out is what gives his early story such a nice irony. But Foreman, who wrote and produced, and his director, Richard Attenborough, don't work the irony too hard. "Young Winston," opening Wednesday at the U.A. Cinema One in Oakbrook, has been conceived as part history, part autobiography and two parts swashbuckling adventure.

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Interview with Carol Lynley

It's finally happened. I went to interview a star, and she was eating caviar and drinking champagne. To be sure, Carol Lynley was wearing a kiddie sweater instead of a mink negligee, but what the hell. They probably don't even make mink negligees anymore.

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Interview with Anthony Quinn

In the movies he plays the natural man, uninhibited and carefree. When we hear his name, we think first of his performance as Zorba the Greek, arms outstretched, leading that dance of life on the beach. And so it is a little unsettling at this late date to find out that Anthony Quinn has been beset by doubts and devils, and was just as screwed-up as the rest of us.

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Interview with Frank Perry

During the earlier days of the Venice Film Festival, the face of Frank Perry had worn a slightly distracted look. He was there, he was listening, he was talking, but somehow his mind seemed to be on a slightly different frequency than anybody else's. This is a common state and not unique with Perry; all movie directors have it as the day for the first public showing of their newest movie grows near.

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Interview with Marjoe Gortner

Marjoe Gortner is not listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as having been the world's youngest preacher, but he should be. Marjoe performed his first marriage at the age of 4 and even Jesus didn't come out until he was 12.

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Gordon Parks' big score

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For Gordon Parks, the first black director in the history of the Hollywood film, it all began more than 30 years ago when he was an assistant bartender on the North Coast Limited between Chicago and Seattle.

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Interview with Yaphet Kotto

"You know what this black woman told me today?" Yaphet Kotto said. "She said my movie was the first time in the movies she ever saw a black man take a black woman out on a date. Dinner, romantic music, the whole thing."

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Interview with Max J. Rosenberg

A producer of horror films doesn't actually need fangs and little points on his ears, but it would help. He doesn't need to quaff blood at every meal, but...cole slaw? Dishes and dishes of cole slaw? This is a horror movie producer?

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