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The Last of Robin Hood

A title as good as "The Last of Robin Hood" deserves a better movie. In fact, it deserves a good movie.

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As Above, So Below

It's that rare found-footage film with a strong premise, a memorably eccentric style, and plenty of energy to burn. It's also poorly conceived, and hard…

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

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Interview with Jim Brown

This guy Jim Brown is on the level. For a couple of years there have been stories about Brown doing this and Brown doing that, Brown breaking up places like Bogart used to do, Brown allegedly heaving girls off the balcony, and eventually you get the notion he's trouble.

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Interview with Larry Parks

Twenty years after he starred in "The Jolson Story," Larry Parks still meets people like the cab driver who took him to the theater the other day. Parks and his wife, Betty Garrett, got into the cab and the driver said, "Say, aren't you Larry Parks? I saw you in the Jolson picture."

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Abbey Lincoln: "You can't really tell the story until everyone gets on the stage."

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Some of the critics said "For Love of Ivy" was just one more stereotyped Hollywood boy-gets-girl comedy, only this time Sidney Poitier got Abbey Lincoln instead of Cary Grant not quite getting Doris Day. "Well, yes, we're all stereotypes," Abbey Lincoln said. "That's because people tend to be alike. In the movie, Ivy is a colored maid. But if she had been a doctor, her emotional experiences would have been the same. And the movie could have been shot in Japan or Germany, and you would still care about what happens to Ivy."

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Interview with Jerry Paris

"You name it, I played it," said Jerry Paris. "I was the co-pilot, the best friend, the roommate, the Army buddy. In three movies, I was second banana to Bonzo the monkey. Remember Bonzo? He was the number one monkey in Hollywood, bigger even than Cheetah the Chimp, until he was killed in a tragic fire. Let's see. I was in 'Bonzo Goes to College,' and in 'Monkey Business,' and another one. 'Monkey Business,' also had Marilyn Monroe and Cary Grant, but as I recall Bonzo got equal billing.

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Interview with Michael Todd, Jr.

"In 1946, my father placed third in a poll to name the most famous movie producer in America," Michael Todd Jr. said. "Know what was funny? At the time, he had never produced a single movie. Oh, he had a lot of deals going. He had a contract with Universal to make nine movies. He never made any.

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Interview with Ginger Lacey

NEWMARKET, ENGLAND - "I'd rather fight in a Spitfire but fly in a Hurricane," said Ginger Lacey. He raised his glass of ale, quaffed the foam off the top and, in the same motion, wiped his mustache clear on the sleeve of his sport coat.

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