In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”


The Good Dinosaur

A film that has some promising elements and which often seems as if it is on the verge of evolving into something wonderful but never…


The Danish Girl

The Danish Girl lacks an immediacy and vibrancy, as well as a genuine sense of emotional connection.

Other Reviews
Review Archives

Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…


Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

Other Reviews
Great Movie Archives

'Twas the Night Before Pogo

Kelly-ToTheMoon-02_100.jpgKelly-ToTheMoon-03_100.jpgKelly-ToTheMoon-04_100.jpgKelly-ToTheMoon-05_100.jpgKelly-ToTheMoon-06_100.jpgKelly-ToTheMoon-07_100.jpgKelly-ToTheMoon-08_100.jpgKelly-ToTheMoon-09_100.jpgKelly-ToTheMoon-10_100.jpgWalt Kelly was the greatest daily comic strip artist in American history. His Pogo strip was an uncanny mixture of laughter, high spirits and swamp intrigue, mixed with pointed political satire. His thinly-veiled villain based on Sen. Joseph McCarthy was one of several characters with political overtones.

Before, during and after my days at The Daily Illini, Pogo was the only strip we carried.

I met Walt Kelly once. He invited a group of visiting editors of college newspapers to join him in the big round booth at the front of a bar very close to the New York Herald-Tribune, where Pogo was one of the mainstays, including Jimmy Breslin, Tom Wolfe, Judith Crist, Clay Felker and others. He was a very nice man.

This material is copyrighted by the Estate of Walt Kelly. It has been posted on the web.

Visit the official site at

Popular Blog Posts

Who do you read? Good Roger, or Bad Roger?

This message came to me from a reader named Peter Svensland. He and a fr...

Anton Ego and Jesse Eisenberg: some notes on the presumed objectivity of critics

Matt Zoller Seitz reviews and reflects upon Jesse Eisenberg's New Yorker piece about film critics.

Reveal Comments
comments powered by Disqus