In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

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The Do-Over

At one point, I checked the time code on Netflix and saw that the movie had over forty minutes to go. I visibly winced.

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Of Men and War

Bécue-Renard brings his own brutality to the topic of PTSD, by putting us at odds with feeling his subjects' pain, or only studying it.

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

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Racially distorted view of L.A.

From: Ann C. Vassiliou, Sherman Oaks, CA

I like Roger Ebert and think he’s an excellent film critic. However, I disagree with his defense of the movie "Crash." I thought it was a powerful, but very disjointed film. I thought "Brokeback Mountain" was a masterpiece. I think there is much validity to Kenneth Turan’s article. Having lived in Los Angeles since 1984, and coming here from the South, I have long thought that L.A. is an extremely racially divided city. It has bothered me for many, many years.

The Academy voters basically echoed my view when they selected "Crash" as Best Picture. It presents a very bleak picture of the city of Los Angeles. Just because a film addresses the issue of racism doesn’t mean it’s a great film. I am a heterosexual Christian. I didn’t view "Brokeback Mountain" as a pro gay-rights film in any way, shape or form. I saw it as a film about love, loss, sadness and the human condition.

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