In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

RogerEbert.com

Thumb logan lucky poster

Logan Lucky

Watching it is like finding money in the pocket of a coat that you haven’t worn in years.

Thumb mv5bmtc1mjawmdi0nv5bml5banbnxkftztgwnjgzmjmwmzi . v1 sy1000 cr0 0 674 1000 al

Patti Cake$

The sense of place and uniformly superb performances make it worth seeing, and maybe ultimately singing along with.

Other Reviews
Review Archives
Thumb xbepftvyieurxopaxyzgtgtkwgw

Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

Other Reviews
Great Movie Archives
Other Articles
Far Flunger Archives

I've seen that film before...

I've been following the comments about Paul Haggis' “Crash” with interest, far more than I did in seeing the film itself. When it came out, I don't think I knew it was by Haggis. Had I known, I probably would have tried harder to see it, because Haggis was the creator of one of the best TV series I have ever seen, a very short-lived show called “EZ Streets,” which had a large ensemble cast (much like “Crash”) dealing with crime, political corruption, drug abuse, revenge, and much more. I remember watching it at the time and comparing it with the work of one of my favourite directors and writers, John Sayles- specifically his film “City of Hope.”

Advertisement

When CRASH appeared in theatres last year, I remember watching the ads and thinking that it looked like a darker version of Lawrence Kasdan's "Grand Canyon," and I wondered how many times that movie needed to be made. I already have a bit of a grudge against Kasdan for stealing from Sayles: I didn't feel much like seeing Haggis stealing from Kasdan stealing from Sayles.

I know, we're supposed to see movies before we critique them, we're supposed to judge them on their own merits, but sometimes as a regular moviegoer I feel that I have the right to stay away from something that I feel like I have seen before, no matter how critically acclaimed it is. I may see it on video later and regret my choice; so be it. Perhaps part of the problem is how the movie is promoted. In any case, if Paul Haggis' next film is about a pair of twin girls who meet for the first time at summer camp and conspire to reunite their separated parents, I doubt I will see that either, even if it is a new idea to some.

Keep up the good work,

Scott Marshall
New Brunswick, CANADA

Reveal Comments
comments powered by Disqus