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Split

It’s exciting to see Shyamalan on such confident footing once more, all these years later.

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Video Interview: Angelina Jolie on "Unbroken"

Angelina Jolie sat in the director's chair for the first time with the 2011 feature “In the Land of Blood and Honey,” set in the contentious Bosnian War. “Unbroken,” her second feature, is epic in scope, spanning the life of American Olympian and World War II veteran Louis Zamperini (portrayed in the film by English actor Jack O’Connell), whose amazing survival story was documented in Laura Hillenbrand’s book, “Unbroken”. Zamperini passed away in July 2014 at the age of 97 but was a constant source of inspiration and guidance for Jolie throughout the shooting of the movie which took place primarily in Sydney, Australia.

In this video interview Australian film journalist Katherine Tulich talks to Jolie about the challenges of directing “Unbroken”, why the actress prefers to be behind the camera these days and directing her husband Brad Pitt on her new project "By the Sea”.

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