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Southside With You

Southside with You builds its emotional richness by coasting on the charisma of its two leads as they carefully navigate each other’s personality quirks and…

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Don't Breathe

Don’t Breathe gets a little less interesting as it proceeds to its inevitable conclusion, but it works so well up to that point that your…

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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'Tourist' gives Geena Davis a place in sun

LOS ANGELES "The Accidental Tourist" is one of the bleakest comedies I've ever seen, a movie so sad you can hardly believe you're laughing a lot of the time, and that you're walking out of the theater feeling good. A lot of that credit for that paradox belongs to an actress named Geena Davis, who walks into the movie and walks out with William Hurt's dog.

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Even as dope dealer in 'Sunrise,' Mel Gibson's honesty shines through

LOS ANGELES Kurt Russell says that Mel Gibson has a sort of Gary Cooperish quality, a kind of inbred honesty that comes across no matter what kind of role he's in. That quality is so strong that it even causes some confusion in "Tequila Sunrise," the new thriller now at Chicago area theaters in which Gibson plays a retired drug dealer, and Russell plays the narc who was his boyhood friend.

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Garr gets serious about her image

'I had some guy this morning - I hate questions like this - some guy who said to me, Do you perceive yourself as kind of a ditz? I wanted to bust him in the chops. But I held back. Because being on `Letterman,' people get that idea."

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'Things Change' for Don Ameche

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There is a scene in "Things Change" where Don Ameche is in a steam room with a towel draped across himself, and this is not a man who looks 80 years old. You look at the scene and you reflect that he made "Ramona" in 1936 and has two movies coming out in the autumn of 1988 and you wonder what his secret is. He is glad to share it with you. His secret is clean living.

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Shirley MacLaine: Apparently sane

TORONTO -- Shirley MacLaine hadn't made a film for almost five years, not since she won the Oscar for "Terms of Endearment," and so when the role of the old piano teacher came along, maybe her first thought was to take a pass. She would have to play old and look old, and be just as stubborn at the end of the movie as she was at the beginning. Was this trip necessary?

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Passions run deep for James Caan

`Hey, these are new carrots," James Caan said, grabbing one and chewing on it. "Not the old carrots we had before. You stick them in that stuff, though, you undo all of the good." He looked sternly at a bowl of sour cream dip. He had a bandage around the arm he was using to eat the carrots, and I asked him what had happened, and he said nothing, stupid football thing, not worth talking about. So I made a note of that. There is hardly anything that James Caan thinks is not worth talking about.

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Interview with Theresa Russell

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TORONTO, Canada -- "At the age of 16, I was in charge of myself," Theresa Russell was saying. "I grew up kind of fast. My mother was 18 when I was born. She split with my father when I was 6, and married another man when I was about 7. My mother was about 25, my stepfather was about 26, I'm six or seven, I was looking at them and I knew they were just too young.

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Barbara Hershey goes from quirky to 'Shy'

CANNES, France -- Sometimes at the Cannes Film Festival you see a masterpiece that strikes you in a certain way, and you are sure it wi ll be a success all over the world. Sometimes you are right, but sometimes you are wrong. Last year at Cannes, I saw "Shy People," a bold and unusual drama about a chic magazine writer who ventures into the bayous of Louisiana to seek a long-lost cousin who turns out to be a cross between a swamp woman and a force of nature. The film had such an effect on me that I was sure it would be felt by others.

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