In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

RogerEbert.com

Thumb_large_20ut2u5dmgl6szdu0adaq8u5zoc

The Interview

Opportunities at rich satire flatten out into Hangover dude-dope-doodoo jokes, where the premise is that there’s nothing funnier than watching over-privileged grown men act out…

Thumb_american_sniper

American Sniper

American Sniper proves the dictum “never count an auteur out” by proving itself as Eastwood’s strongest directorial effort since 2009's underrated Invictus pretty much right…

Other Reviews
Review Archives
Thumb_xbepftvyieurxopaxyzgtgtkwgw

Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

Thumb_jrluxpegcv11ostmz1fqha1bkxq

Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

Other Reviews
Great Movie Archives
Other Articles
Channel Archives
Primary_eb20111015filmfestivals04111019987ar

The winners of Chicago Filmfest 2011

The 47th Chicago International Film Festival gave its top award, a Gold Hugo for Best Film, to Aki Kaurismaki's drama "Le Havre" (Finland/France). Idrissa, an illegal immigrant, finds allies in a French port city. On Friday, Michael Kutza, the festival's founder and artistic director, and programmer Mimi Plauche, announced decisions of five-member International Feature jury that weighed 17 different features in competition.

The second-place Silver Hugo went to "Cairo 678." A Silver Hugo for Best Actor went to Maged El Kedwany from that Egyptian drama.

"The Forgiveness of Blood" (US/ Albania) earned co-writers Joshua Marston and Andamion Murataj a Silver Hugo for Best Screenplay. In the New Directors Competition, "The Good Son" (Finland) beat 13 other features for the Gold Hugo. A Silver Hugo was bestowed on "Volcano" (Iceland/ Denmark), the debut of Runar Runarsson.

Here is how the winning "Le Havre" was described by Sun-Times film critic Roger Ebert: "To describe any film by the deadpan Finnish director Aki Kaurismaki as upbeat may seem unexpected, and indeed this is no comedy, but it's more tender and hopeful than his usual brilliant work. A shoeshine man (Andre Wilms) in the French port city encounters a young African boy who hoped to enter Europe hidden in a container. Taking him in, he enlists his wife and neighbors to hide him, and goes to extraordinary lengths to reunite him with his mother in London. Kaurismaki's usual flat, objective gaze is employed, and his favorite actress, the usually glum Kati Outinen, plays the wife. Like all his films, compulsively involving."

In the Docufest Competition, Serbian director Mila Turajlic scored a Gold Hugo for her "Cinema Kominsto," an ironic and elegiac look at the film industry in the former Yugoslavia.

Jurors for the After Dark Competition saluted "Snowtown" (Australia) and "A Lonely Place to Die" (UK).

Among the short films winning prizes are "The Eagleman Stag" and "The Unliving," a Swedish zombie drama whose "idiosyncratic detailing" the jury admired. "L Train," beautifully made by Anna Musso during a blizzard, won the Chicago Award. Presented by Cinema/ Chicago, the Chicago International Film Festival continues through Thursday with a Closing Night Presentation of Michel Hazanavicius's "The Artist." This black-and-white salute to silent-era stars won the Founder's Award, which is given by Kutza to a "film across all categories that captures the spirit" of the festival.

Next Wednesday offers 11 "Best of the Festival" screenings, partly based on print availability and popularity with audiences. Titles will be posted Monday on the festival's Web site at www.chicagofilmfestival.com. All screenings are at AMC River East 21, 322 E. Illinois St.

Popular Blog Posts

Who do you read? Good Roger, or Bad Roger?

This message came to me from a reader named Peter Svensland. He and a fr...

Dear Angelina: Thoughts on "Cleopatra"

A letter to Angelina Jolie about the casting of her upcoming take on "Cleopatra."

The Ten Best TV Programs of 2014

The best television programs of 2014.

Roger Moore's Best: "The Spy Who Loved Me"

An FFC comments on Roger Moore's best James Bond film, "The Spy Who Loved Me."

Reveal Comments
comments powered by Disqus