In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”


Ouija: Origin of Evil

By the time it gets to the Polish-speaking ghosts and the ghoulish Nazi doctor, you’re so invested in the characters that you’re willing to buy…


Jack Reacher: Never Go Back

It’s a pity that Jack Reacher: Never Go Back fails to support Cruise and his costars, all of whom are acting as if their lives…

Other Reviews
Review Archives

Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

Other Reviews
Great Movie Archives
Other Articles
Blog Archives
Other Articles
Channel Archives


"Sheep, Galloway, Sheep!"Paul Galloway, a beloved legend


Paul Galloway as Tootsie on Michigan Ave. (Photo by Jack Lane)

Chicago Sun-Times / February 3, 2009

We will never hear the Sheep Story again. Nor will we enjoy his presence in a room, which was an invitation to good cheer. Paul Galloway, the most incomparable raconteur I ever met in a newsroom, is dead. Everyone who knew him will know what a silence that creates.

I loved the guy. I introduced him to his wife, Maggie. I couldn't see enough of them. It will be impossible to share with you the joy of his company, but I am going to try. Let others write the formal obituaries. All I know is, Paul died at about 3:30 p.m. Monday, at their "winter home" in Tulsa, Okla. There's a Winter Home Story. With Paul, there was a story about everything. He was somewhere in his 70s. When you get to be our age, "somewhere" is close enough.

Continue reading →

"It's a Black President Huey Freeman!" (nsfw)


I can hardly believe I didn't know that Werner Herzog starred in an episode of "Boondocks." This link was sent to me by a reader. Is that Herzog's own voice.It sounds real to me. In any event, Herzog's precise and implacable narration is essential here, and The Voice is the medium as well as The Message in his documentaries.

Continue reading →

The color of our emotions, or, "色,戒"

Lust. Caution. Lust, Caution. Lust...Caution.

The English name of Ang Lee's 2007 film consists of two words. Taken separately, they stand alone as individual concepts: Lust, a primal, human urge; Caution, an evolved, societal tool. Put them side-by-side, and contrast emerges: primal versus evolved, individual versus society, incongruent. Poke a little hole in the membrane that separates the two, and dynamics shift. Lust surges in the face of Caution. Caution stares right back, coolly, unflinching.

Continue reading →

Patty Andrews: Last call for the Bugle Girl


Patty Andrews of Andrews Sisters rallied troops

By BOB THOMAS, Associated Press Writer

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Patty Andrews never served in the military, but she and her singing sisters certainly supported the troops.

During World War II, they hawked war bonds, entertained soldiers overseas and boosted morale on the home-front with tunes like "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy of Company B" and "I Can Dream, Can't I?"

Andrews, the last surviving member of the singing Andrews Sisters trio, died Wednesday at 94 of natural causes at her home in the Los Angeles suburb of Northridge, said family spokesman Alan Eichler in a statement.

"When I was a kid, I only had two records and one of them was the Andrews Sisters. They were remarkable. Their sound, so pure," said Bette Midler, who had a hit cover of "Bugle Boy" in 1973.

"Everything they did for our nation was more than we could have asked for. This is the last of the trio, and I hope the trumpets ushering (Patty) into heaven with her sisters are playing 'Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy.'"

The Andrews' "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" gave Bette Midler one of her biggest hits. This video shows her performing it over a period of 30 years, always with the same choreography.

Continue reading →

Free sample of Ebert Club Newsletter


This is a free sample of the Newsletter members receive each week. It contains content gathered from recent past issues and reflects the growing diversity of what's inside the club. To join and become a member, visit Roger's Invitation From the Ebert Club.

Marie writes: Not too long ago, Monaco's Oceanographic Museum held an exhibition combining contemporary art and science, in the shape of a huge installation by renowned Franco-Chinese artist Huang Yong Ping, in addition to a selection of films, interviews and a ballet of Aurelia jellyfish.The sculpture was inspired by the sea, and reflects upon maritime catastrophes caused by Man. Huang Yong Ping chose the name "Wu Zei"because it represents far more than just a giant octopus. By naming his installation "Wu Zei," Huang added ambiguity to the work. 'Wu Zei' is Chinese for cuttlefish, but the ideogram 'Wu' is also the color black - while 'Zei' conveys the idea of spoiling, corrupting or betraying. Huang Yong Ping was playing with the double meaning of marine ink and black tide, and also on corruption and renewal. By drawing attention to the dangers facing the Mediterranean, the exhibition aimed to amaze the public, while raising their awareness and encouraging them to take action to protect the sea.

Continue reading →

Preview some commercials for Superbowl 2013


Give this page a little time to load.

• Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans, Louisiana, on February 3, 2013 at 6:30 EST.

• Price tag: $3.5 million for 30 seconds; $5 million for placement before kickoff.

• A detailed article by Gayle Falkenthal in the Washington Times.

Continue reading →

The smell of the taste of money

You'll probably despise the main characters in the coldly lavish new South Korean film "The Taste of Money" (2012). I was about to describe them as belonging to the top 1%, but given how shallow and hateful these people are, I think it would be more accurate to say "the bottom 0.01%." They're a plutocratic family at the very top of South Korean society. They run a big, influential conglomerate like Samsung and LG (which are also family businesses at their core). They can buy and do anything because of their wealth and the power which comes with it. In their view, they deserve to be called VVIPs, or very, very important people.

Continue reading →

The man who will live forever in a land of noir


I've been known to say that in movies, I prefer b&w to color. A b&w film adds by subtracting: The world is in color, so we get that free. B&W steps in and imposes another dimension, separating the content from the mere realistic recording of it. Once, for the fun of it, I adjusted my TV set and watched the color film "LA Confidential" entirely in black and white. Try a little of that someday. You may be surprised. Thanks to Maggie Galloway for the first link.

CYBORG FOUNDATION | Rafel Duran Torrent from Focus Forward Films on Vimeo.

Under this video on Vimeo, I read:

"Neil Harbisson was born with achromatopsia, a rare condition that causes complete colour blindness. In 2004, Harbisson and Adam Montandon developed the eyeborg, a device that translates colours into sounds. Harbisson has been claimed to be the first recognized cyborg in the world, as his passport photo now includes his device. In 2010, Neil Harbisson and Moon Ribas created the Cyborg Foundation, an international organization to help humans become cyborgs. The foundation has also experimented with other sensory devices, including an "earborg," which translates sound into color, and a "speedborg," which allows people to detect movement through electronic earrings that vibrate.

Directed & Produced & Edited by: Rafel Duran Torrent

Continue reading →

Sundance New Frontier: The Volcano


"Eyjafjallalokull" is a stunning and moving video art installation that played at Sundance in the "New Frontier" art exhibition space. I visited the piece several times. Nicolas Boritch, director of the AntiVJ visual label and producer of "Eyjafjallalokull" ("The Volcano" for short) wants to put viewers in a space where "they just forget where they are and they forget about understanding anything because we want to leave a lot of space for the audience to create their own story or to find whatever they want to find."

Continue reading →