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Deep Web

Winter focuses so tightly on the details of his chosen story that he fails to place it in the context of overall issues of internet…

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

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Jack Kerouac: 3/12/22 - 10/21/69

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• • •"The only people for me are the mad ones, the ones who are mad to live, mad to talk, mad to be saved, desirous of everything at the same time, the ones who never yawn or say a commonplace thing, but burn, burn, burn, like fabulous yellow roman candles exploding like spiders across the stars and in the middle you see the blue centerlight pop and everybody goes "Awww!" • • •

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Oscar-worthy B-rated trailers

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Marie writes: In the wake of the 84th Academy Awards, I couldn't help but reflect upon all the films that have been deemed unworthy of recognition over the years, and with a measure of empathy - especially for the really bad ones - as even those filming a piece of unwatchable crap secretly dream of winning an Oscar for it. Indeed; many a bottle of cheap shampoo has undoubtedly been raised and tearfully clutched before a bathroom mirror, whilst in a drug-induced fantasy of receiving one amidst the deafening roar of applause.And so on behalf of delusional dreamers everywhere, the Ebert Club would like to present the following nominees for BEST b-rated trailer!  The winner will be determined by reader votes and announced on Wed 14, 2012; so vote early, vote often and don't be afraid to change your mind at the last minute.  And to explore an even more eclectic assortment of discoveries, please join the Ebert Club. Your subscription helps support the Newsletter, the Far-Flung Correspondents and the On-Demanders on Roger's site.

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Remembering Bukowski

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Charles Bukowski died on his day in 1994. His voice is open and fearless, romantic, honest. He probably has a whole generation of writers getting drunk and wondering why they can't write like that.

In Big Ed's during the filming of "Barfly." Left to right, Bukowski, Ebert, Faye Dunaway, visiting fireman Andre Konchalovsky.

My story about a day on location with "Barfly."

Tom O'Bedlam reads Bukowski's incomparable "Who in the Hell is Tom Jones?"

Bukowski sits in the back set of a convertible and gives a running commentary along Hollywood Boulevard.

Bukowski photos and a song by Johnny Cash

Bono reads "Roll the Dice" by Bukowski

Charles Bukowski Reads "The Fire Station"

Tom Waits reads Bukowski's "The Laughing Heart," Hanks version of Ecclesiates 7, 3 -12:

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The delightful Mr. Pepys

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Realizing I would never read his great book, I got the audiobook and entered the world of the charming Mr. Pepys. Ambitious, lustful, a gossip, well-connected, he witnessed the Great London Fire, the Black Plague and Shakespeare's plays at court, buried gold in his back yard, became Secretary of the Admiralty, seduced servant girls.

Branagh's reading is conversational, confiding and funny. The prose can appear daunting on the page, but he makes it conversational. Pepys' voice comes through, as if he's confiding the low-down on things.

This is good for listening to in the car, because each daily entry is brief, so you don't get stranded in the middle of a long chapter when you have to park. The "home page" of Pepys' Diary. Tweets rhymes with Pepys. Samuel Pepys on Twitter.

Drawing by Richard Levine from the New York Review of Books.

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The Kennel Murder Case

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The Ebert Club invites you to enjoy "The Kennel Murder Case" (1933) streaming free. And please join the Club to explore an eclectic assortment of discoveries. Your subscription helps support the Newsletter, the Far-Flung Correspondents and the On-Demanders on my site. - Roger Ebert

The Kennel Murder Case (1933) Directed by Michael Curtiz. Screenplay by Robert N. Lee, Robert Presnell Sr. and Peter Milne. Based on the novel "The Kennel Murder Case" by S.S. Van Dine. Starring William Powell, Mary Astor, Eugene Pallette, Ralph Morgan, Robert McWade, Robert Barrat, Frank Conroy, Etienne Girardot, James Lee, Paul Cavanagh, Arthur Hohl and Helen Vinson.Synopsis: "Archer Coe has been found dead in his locked bedroom. The cops consider it suicide, but Philo believes otherwise. When the Coroner shows up, he finds that Archer had been hit with a blunt object, stabbed and shot - making suicide unlikely. When the evidence points to his brother, Brisbane is found stabbed to death in the closet. Archer had a number of enemies, any one of which would have been glad to knock him off, but which one did and how did the murder occur in a room looked from the inside. Only one man, the keen, fascinating, debonair detective Philo Vance, would be able to figure out who is the killer..."Note: Film historians such as William K. Everson, who pronounced The Kennel Murder Case a "masterpiece" (in the August 1984 issue of Films in Review) consider it one of the greatest screen adaptations of a Golden Age mystery novel; ranking it with the 1946 film Green for Danger. - Wikipedia

The Ebert Club: A weekly newsletter of discoveries, news, trailers, free streamers and eccentric miscellany, celebrating its 102th issue!  Join the Club here.  A member's link allows you to browse previous issues.

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Siskel & Ebert fight over a toy train

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I've never forgotten this show, but feared it was lost forever. Now it's turned up on YouTube. How well I remember the day we taped this special! I couldn't get anything to work. Maybe this is historical evidence of why I've never gotten along with video games. Gene Siskel's comic timing is flawless here, and I make a great Oliver Hardy. Stay tuned while we play "Wheel of Fortune" via low-tech VHS tape.

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