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Steve Jobs

The fact that he doesn’t try to redeem these flawed, fascinating figures—or even try to make you like them in the slightest way—feels like an…



Every once in a while, a movie comes along that is so punishing to one’s mental and physical being that the narrative should be divided…

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…


Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

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Rediscovered: "Revolver," long lost Carl Sandburg poem about guns and their evil power


"In an apparently unpublished and previously unknown poem, Carl Sandburg addressed the topic of guns. Titled "A Revolver," the short piece was discovered last week among Sandburg's archives, housed in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign."

Click here for the story behind the rediscovery of the poem at the Univesity of Ilinois LIbrary.

Thanks for the link to Larry J. Kolb.

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The trailer for the Coen Brothers' "Inside Llewyn Davis" about the 1960s folk era in Greenwich Village


Anne Thompson writes on Indiewire: "While any Joel and Ethan Coen movie is worth waiting for, many of us are champing at the bit to see "Inside Llewyn Davis," their portrait of the 60s Greenwich Village folk scene that spawned Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Mimi and Richard Farina and the inspiration for this film, Dave Van Ronk. Some of us hoped to see the film loosely based on Van Ronk's memoir "The Mayor of MacDougal Street" in time for the 2012 holiday season, but it's more likely to turn up in Coen-friendly Cannes."

Click here and to read her scoop with much more about the film.

The star is Oscar Issac (from "Drive"). The cast includes Coen favorite John Goodman, Carey Mulligan and F. Murray Abraham.

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