In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

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Get Out

We need more directors willing to take risks with films like Get Out.

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A Cure for Wellness

As a fetish object, it’s impressive. But as a fully satisfying feature-length drama, it’s a bust.

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Thumbnails 6/28/2013

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A Civil Rights-era test to see if you're smart enough to vote; what you need to know about the situation in Turkey; the director of 20 Feet from Stardom, interviewed; new classical music suggestions for Hollywood villains; something about Like Clockwork; guess which critic wrote this un-bylined New York Times review?

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Ca va bien: Two Godard Films New to DVD and Blu-ray

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Distribution company Olive Films has released two obscurities by Jean-Luc Godard, 1976's "Comment Ca Va" and 1987's "Soigne ta Droite" (known in the U.S. as "Keep Your Right Up") and while these films may not have the immediate impact of his better-known works, they both reveal a filmmaker who has spent his career challenging himself, his viewers and the very medium of cinema itself in ways that are oftentimes fascinating and frustrating in equal measure.

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thumbnails 6/26/2013

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Defense of Marriage Act struck down; anti-abortion bill in Texas defeated; the Civil War rages on in film; how Under the Dome proves that TV shows don't have to pay for themselves with ads; why The Simpsons is TV's most God-friendly series; appreciating Steve Wonder; two Mad Men video essays, on the show's depiction of Vietnam and the gradual evolution of Peggy Olson.

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Thumbnails 6/25/2013

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The "accidental racism" of Paula Deen; Curtis Mayfield as musical journalist; Stephen Fry's ongoing struggle with depression; Rex Reed still thinks Melissa McCarthy is, oh, don't make us repeat it, just read it; why NBC newsman David Gregory is what's wrong with Washington; Richard Matheson at 20,000 feet; what the heck is an aspect ratio, anyway?

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The Mundane Uncanny: The Art of Richard Matheson, 1926-2013

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Peter Sobczynski eulogizes the late, great, astoundingly prolific writer Richard Matheson, "whose work in a career that would encompass seven decades influenced anyone who encountered, it regardless of the medium he was working in." Includes appreciations of "Duel," "Nightmare at 20,000 Feet," "I Am Legend," "Somewhere in Time" and many other works, original and adapted.

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thumbnails 6/24/2013

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The future of affirmative action; what it means to be "Pro-Putin"; Jaws the Revenge, re-shredded; James Gandolfini, cautionary tale; Isadora Duncan's forgotten art; getting to the bottom of that mysterious Mad Men poster; Roger and Gene rave about Star Wars on Nightline.

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Cut to Black: "The Sopranos" and the Future of TV Drama: Table of Contents

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Table of contents for "Cut to Black," a discussion of The Sopranos' ending and the future of TV drama; contains links to all six episodes, plus transcripts. Participants include RogerEbert.com editor and New York Magazine critic Matt Zoller Seitz, Huffington Post TV critic Maureen Ryan, A.V. Club TV critic Ryan McGee, and previously.tv contributor Sarah D. Bunting. And yes, they do get into whether Tony got whacked.

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Cut to Black: "The Sopranos" and the Future of TV Drama, Part 5

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Part 5 of "Cut to Black," a videotaped roundtable discussion about the end of The Sopranos and the future of television drama. Participants include RogerEbert.com editor and New York Magazine TV critic Matt Zoller Seitz, Huffington Post TV critic Maureen Ryan, A.V. Club TV critic Ryan McGee, and previously.tv contributor Sarah D. Bunting. Shot and edited by Dave Bunting, Jr.

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