In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

RogerEbert.com

Thumb wormwood 2017

Wormwood

A fascinating piece of filmmaking that challenges the form in new ways as it recalls themes its director has been interested in his entire career.

Other Reviews
Review Archives
Thumb xbepftvyieurxopaxyzgtgtkwgw

Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

Other Reviews
Great Movie Archives
Other Articles
Chaz's Journal Archives
Primary goodbye to language 002 heloise godet

NYFF Interview: Héloïse Godet of "Goodbye to Language"

Héloïse Godet has an air of holy mystery about her here in New York. Like a luckier-than-usual Icarus, she's flown as close to the sun as possible and lived to tell about it. She worked with Jean-Luc Godard, the man who pulled cinema into an age of post-modernism when it was barely ready for modernism. The trajectory of Godard's story is well-known to anyone with a cinema studies degree, but less well-covered is his working method today. Interviews with anyone who collaborated with the press-shy Swiss master are being sought and consumed with equal fervor. What was it like just being in the presence of the man who made "Breathless", "Contempt" and "Pierrot Le Fou", then through all of that away to make arch, troubling experiments in early video like "Numéro Deux" and "France / tour / detour / deux / enfants" before finally winding up in this, the autumn of his career. Since 2001's heart-stoppingly beautiful "Éloge de l'amour," Godard has appeared only sporadically, rearing his head to remind us what polarizing really means, then vanishing for years. He's back again, with "Goodbye to Language," his first film in 3D, and 3D's first outre arthouse extravaganza. Behold the first 3D dutch tilt, the first 3D collage movie, the first 3D trip to the bathroom, the first 3D recycling of scenes from “Piranha 3D,” and on and on. Godard has recalibrated 3D into a revolutionary new investigative tool, a sensory marvel, and fittingly, the experience of watching "Goodbye To Language" is akin to forcing your brain to experience a violent re-birth into a new age, one we haven't named yet. Naturally, I had a few questions for Héloïse Godet, the lead actress, about what it was like being part of this experiment. I like to think the noise from the air conditioning vent and my shaking a little from a feverish cold adds a little of that discomfort into the proceeding, but maybe we shouldn't be able to talk about "Goodbye To Language" without falling under its disorienting spell once more.

New York Film Festival Interview - Héloïse Godet from Scout Tafoya on Vimeo.

Advertisement

Popular Blog Posts

Why I Stopped Watching Woody Allen Movies

Stop watching movies made by assholes. It'll be OK.

A Composer For All Seasons: On the Range of John Williams

A look at the work of John Williams outside of his greatest hits.

The Ten Best Films of 2017

The RogerEbert.com picks for the ten best films of 2017.

The Individual Top Tens of 2017

The lists of best films of 2017.

Reveal Comments
comments powered by Disqus