In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

RogerEbert.com

Thumb wormwood 2017

Wormwood

A fascinating piece of filmmaking that challenges the form in new ways as it recalls themes its director has been interested in his entire career.

Other Reviews
Review Archives
Thumb xbepftvyieurxopaxyzgtgtkwgw

Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

Other Reviews
Great Movie Archives
Other Articles
Chaz's Journal Archives

Contributors

Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert became film critic of the Chicago Sun-Times in 1967. He is the only film critic with a star on Hollywood Boulevard Walk of Fame and was named honorary life member of the Directors' Guild of America. He won the Lifetime Achievement Award of the Screenwriters' Guild, and honorary degrees from the American Film Institute and the University of Colorado at Boulder. Since 1989 he has hosted Ebertfest, a film festival at the Virginia Theater in Champaign-Urbana. From 1975 until 2006 he, Gene Siskel and Richard Roeper co-hosted a weekly movie review program on national TV. He was Lecturer on Film for the University of Chicago extension program from 1970 until 2006, and recorded shot-by-shot commentaries for the DVDs of "Citizen Kane," "Casablanca," "Floating Weeds" and "Dark City," and has written over 20 books.

Reviews Filter Show Filters | Reset Filters

1914
2017
0
4.0
Widget f3nrqflmaalitlpk1kesouujh4l
V/H/S

(2012)

Widget wikd9n9r6amrqws1m3d0cflpkmd
Frankenweenie

(2012)

Missing poster widget
The Well-Digger's Daughter

(2012)

Widget foylhgtit8pfoehofxbicdzmyrm
The Paperboy

(2012)

Widget 8m4cu75izvsqq7qovmm3k0vckoj
About Cherry

(2012)

Widget 5sovuydxkm7p0qw6ayfjnosdeud
Escape Fire: The Fight to Rescue American Healthcare

(2012)

Widget a5ru7ph1lomwfeihkrozxn4t8ta
Snowman's Land

(2012)

Widget 1yuz9p8bqi3040zyqz3htgfa6bw
Head Games

(2012)

Widget ywzjm7rgzupjtj5oiyem1jqtq01
The Perks of Being a Wallflower

(2012)

Widget mmrikke2koxbnqvfplazb0gwajb
Won't Back Down

(2012)

Widget b2dqhjdssk1cczdsnqx9frt7oky
Pitch Perfect

(2012)

Widget g9fw5mfdn26snjocdpb5mige8jv
Looper

(2012)

Widget 6tk9aesgsbroqazzk1xlmb1eamf
How to Survive a Plague

(2012)

Widget jwzcwkw8amanurifnchl4bnf2uz
Liberal Arts

(2012)

Widget vnwfhltseatupympnxxjloshje3
Trouble with the Curve

(2012)

Widget 8o7xrloe8eadla6pwkecvft0ux4
The Master

(2012)

Widget 9ziwyb1co7vz1s5qkpk6m3tw568
End of Watch

(2012)

Widget bjqmzyt6xacwmjbs4scsux1dfx6
Hello I Must Be Going

(2012)

Widget qvmbzek3nb2gutnzz5md0fqrsjn
Detropia

(2012)

Widget tn8a9qdymuf8nmy1tmhoh4wndxq
Arbitrage

(2012)

Widget n4wkqjwuc0qeyt1aef8a3zcvcbc
Beloved

(2012)

Widget 48dz4mewllwsq3tosky5ghocubt
Samsara

(2012)

Widget na2aeyhbqfienjhfybmviwrfbkb
Alps

(2012)

Widget indsm5wcdmtfksmm7ne8xhjubl7
The Words

(2012)

Here's an intriguing Credit Cookie idea for the end of 'Charlie Wilson's War'

Primary eb20080103answerman801030303ar

Q. You said the final image of "The Assassination of Jessie James" was a Credit Cookie of the last shot of "The Great Train Robbery," with the cowboy firing his gun at the audience. That gave me an idea for a post-credits final image for "Charlie Wilson's War." As the film implies at the end, the aid to Afghanistan had an eventual blow-back, helping fuel the creation of our enemy Al-Qaeda. How about an Afghan fighter firing rockets at Russian planes, then turning his weapon on the camera and firing right at the audience. Rhys Southan, Richardson, Texas

Continue reading →

Movie Answer Man (12/20/2007)

Primary eb20071220answerman77824773ar

Q. I am a devoted fan of Ian McEwan’s novel "Atonement," one of those books that raises your heartbeat and ignites conflicting emotions and thoughts like fireworks exploding in the sky. So many nights I returned to that book to amuse myself for several hours by just repeating the poetry of McEwan’s prose, its words melting over my tongue like butter.

Continue reading →

Movie Answer Man (12/13/2007)

Primary eb20071213answerman712130311ar

Q: The box-office returns for "The Golden Compass" last weekend were modest at best. The film is estimated to have cost more than $150 million and will have a hard time making its money back. The financial disappointment could be catastrophic for New Line Cinema. Not to mention the fact that any chance of an adaptation of The Subtle Knife and The Amber Spyglass (rest of the trilogy) are now slim to nil. Since you gave the film a positive review, what is your opinion of the box-office returns?

Continue reading →