In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

RogerEbert.com

Thumb_yml922hbs9ztawpg1qoslgcpcr1

Aloha

Aloha feels like several films at once, crammed together and sped up, with results that are emotionally hollow and narratively confusing.

Thumb_tu_dors_nicole

Tu dors Nicole

Funny, heartfelt, and gorgeously shot. This is an excellent film.

Other Reviews
Review Archives
Thumb_xbepftvyieurxopaxyzgtgtkwgw

Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

Thumb_jrluxpegcv11ostmz1fqha1bkxq

Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

Other Reviews
Great Movie Archives
Other Articles
Cannes Archives
Other Articles
Far Flunger Archives
Other Articles
Channel Archives

Paranoid Park: A Beaver State of mind

gvspp1.jpg

Under the bridge.

My review of "Paranoid Park" is in the Chicago Sun-Times and on RogerEbert.com. Here's an excerpt:

Many films use scrambled chronology just to make the story seem more interesting than it really is. That's not what happens in "Paranoid Park." The story, told as Alex pencils entries into a lined notebook, is an elliptical record of how he processes the terrible thing that happened one night in the neighborhood of Paranoid Park. The narrative moves in arcs and curves, like the skateboarders who float and glide around in dreamy 8mm slow-motion, as Alex circles the truth in his writing, promising himself, "I'll get it all on paper eventually."

"Paranoid Park" is a companion piece to Van Sant's "Elephant" (his stylized reimagining of a typical high-school day shattered by a Columbine-like massacre) -- and, by extension, "Gerry" and "Last Days" (inspired by the suicide of rock icon Kurt Cobain). Shot mostly in Portland blues and grays by Christopher Doyle and Rain Li, the film takes us inside the gloomy, tormented consciousness of Alex. Like the kids in "Elephant" who negotiate mazes of locker-lined hallways in long, slow takes, Alex moves through space as if he were underwater. He's an outwardly sullen, nearly somnambulistic kid, and there are things going on inside him, weighing him down, that he can't quite grasp, much less articulate....

Popular Blog Posts

Video games can never be art

Having once made the statement above, I have declined all opportunities to ...

Bill Murray, iPhones and Our One-Handed Species

An essay on how technology has rendered us a one-handed species.

Mad Max: Day of Wrath

An FFC writes about the use of Giuseppe Verdi's "Dies Irae" in "Mad Max: Fury Road".

Cannes 2015: "Macbeth," "Ice and the Sky"

A final film report from Cannes on two of the last films for 2015: an update of Macbeth and an environmental document...

Reveal Comments
comments powered by Disqus