In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

RogerEbert.com

Thumb_heaven_is_for_real

Heaven Is for Real

Faith-based film tries reaching past its audience, but falls back on preaching to its own choir way too much.

Other Reviews
Review Archives
Thumb_xbepftvyieurxopaxyzgtgtkwgw

Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

Thumb_jrluxpegcv11ostmz1fqha1bkxq

Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

Other Reviews
Great Movie Archives
Other Articles
Chaz's Blog Archives
Other Articles
Far Flunger Archives
Other Articles
Channel Archives

Reviews

Benefit Of The Doubt

  |  

"Benefit of the Doubt" blows a lot of its suspense in the opening title sequence, as we hear Donald Sutherland testifying before a parole board, "The strength of this country lies in the strength of its families." Since the movie is billed as a thriller, and since his voice sounds sanctimonious but hollow, we know at once he's not sincere; almost before we see him, we know he's the movie's bad guy.

Too bad, because a more interesting movie might have resulted if one of the screenplay's unrealized ideas had been used. That's the possibility that the Sutherland character might, in fact, be innocent. As we meet him, he's being released on parole after serving a 22-year sentence for murdering his wife. The key testimony against him at the trial came from his daughter (Amy Irving), then a child, now a single mom working as a waitress in a strip club.

Did Irving tell the truth in her testimony? The movie tries to build up evidence that she might have been "guided" by a defense attorney. Now, with Sutherland out and headed her way, she's in terror that he might strike again.

"I won't forget this," he told her as he was led off to prison.

Since we know with some certainty that he was in fact guilty, the accuracy of her testimony is a blind alley. We know he killed, and we suspect he'll kill again. But think how much more involving the movie would have been if the first hour played it straight, pretending that Sutherland was unfairly framed, and that he is now prepared to forgive his daughter and start life again. That would make the movie's later developments truly frightening, instead of drearily inevitable.

"Benefit of the Doubt" is a movie without those kind of smarts.

Filmed in and around the Grand Canyon, it puts together sequences as if they were film school exercises. One doesn't lead into another. We are asked, for example, to believe it when dad slithers into bed with his sleeping daughter, and she mistakes him for her dead boyfriend.

Uh-huh.

And what about an extended chase scene in which Irving and her son (Rider Strong) walk miles through the wilderness to get to a lake where they have the keys to a houseboat. On board the boat, fearing Sutherland could still be on the loose, they should obviously go out into the middle of the lake and keep their eyes open. But not in an Idiot Plot like this, where the kid is left home alone.

Things get even more incredible. Irving and her child climb into one speedboat, Sutherland climbs into another, and they chase each other around the lake in a painfully contrived scene, before - get this - grounding the boats so they can resume their chase over the rocks.

There's hardly a moment in "Benefit of the Doubt" when we can believe the events on a psychological level, or even on the level of a manipulative thriller. The performances are good - Sutherland is creepy as he recites his pious platitudes, and it's fun to see Irving in a down-home blue collar role again, a reminder of her work in Willie Nelson's "Honeysuckle Rose" (1980). But the story's so phony it undermines everything.

Popular Blog Posts

Hashtag Activism and the #CancelColbert campaign

The recent #CancelColbert campaign on Twitter raises all kinds of issues about racism, but also about hashtag activism.

Able-Bodied Actors and Disability Drag: Why Disabled Roles are Only for Disabled Performers

Scott Jordan Harris argues that disabled characters should not be played by able-bodied actors.

For the love of it: notes on the decline of Entertainment Weekly, the firing of Owen Gleiberman, and the ongoing end of an era

Owen Gleiberman's sacking as lead film critic of Entertainment Weekly — part of a ritual bloodletting of staffers at ...

The most important thing Roger taught me

The most important thing Roger Ebert taught me.

Reveal Comments
comments powered by Disqus