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Transcendence

"Transcendence" is a serious science fiction movie filled with big ideas and powerful images, but it never quite coheres, and the end is a copout.

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Heaven Is for Real

Faith-based film tries reaching past its audience, but falls back on preaching to its own choir way too much.

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

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Turbo

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This DreamWorks animated picture has an appealingly bizarre premise—a racecar-crazy snail (voiced by Ryan Reynolds) dreams of competing in the Indianapolis 500—and its sense of humor is so odd that at times you wonder if the movie is sending up the cliches that it wouldn't exist without.

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In a heartbeat: "28 Days Later" revisited

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"28 Days Later" might be one of my favorite films. It's not as politically or satirically ambitious as George Romero's zombie pictures, but as a visionary piece of pure cinema—a film that, to paraphrase Roger, is more about how it's about things than what it's about—I think it's unbeatable. A classic.

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Pacific Rim

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The robots-vs.-monsters adventure "Pacific Rim" knows what sort of film it wishes to be; it is that film, and so much more. Guillermo del Toro's sci-fi movie is being sold as an action epic, but its main virtues are beauty, sincerity and heart.

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A house made of candy: On "Despicable Me 2," slapstick and single parenthood

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I won't make any grand claims for the "Despicable Me" films as art, but I adore them anyway. There's something appealingly relaxed and confident about them. They don't quite look, move or feel like any other blockbuster animated cartoons, yet they never seem to be trying too hard. And they're the best portrait of single parenthood I've seen outside of "Louie."

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The Way, Way Back

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"The Way, Way Back", a coming-of-age movie set partly at a water park, is a likable entry in a familiar genre. The cast makes the material feel special even though you've seen the film's component parts before, and the parts don't always fit together naturally.

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The Lone Ranger

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Director Gore Verbinski's take on the Lone Ranger is a gigantic picture with an earnest, klutzy, deeply un-cool hero (Armie Hammer of "The Social Network"), based on a property that most young viewers don't know or care about. The film's poster might as well have been a target. It's lumpy bubblegum with a bitter aftertaste, as obsessive and overbearing as Steven Spielberg's "1941"—and as likely to be re-evaluated twenty years later and described as "misunderstood."

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100 Bloody Acres

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I didn't know what to expect from "100 Bloody Acres," the debut film by sibling writer-directors Colin and Cameron Cairnes; I certainly didn't expect the best low-budget horror comedy since "Shaun of the Dead," and one of the most assured first features in ages.

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Cut to Black: "The Sopranos" and the Future of TV Drama: Table of Contents

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Table of contents for "Cut to Black," a discussion of The Sopranos' ending and the future of TV drama; contains links to all six episodes, plus transcripts. Participants include RogerEbert.com editor and New York Magazine critic Matt Zoller Seitz, Huffington Post TV critic Maureen Ryan, A.V. Club TV critic Ryan McGee, and previously.tv contributor Sarah D. Bunting. And yes, they do get into whether Tony got whacked.

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