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Office Christmas Party

Another reminder that allowing your cast to madly improvise instead of actually providing a coherent script with a scintilla of inherent logic often leads to…

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Harry Benson: Shoot First

The filmmakers are themselves too celebrity besotted to comment in a meaningful way on how Benson’s career balanced depictions of the rich and famous with…

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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My Favorite Roger: Gerardo Valero

"Patch Adams"

Why did I choose this review?

Here in Mexico we tend to be less politically correct than in the U.S. and truth be told, the only times Roger would ever edit any content from my submissions to his site would be if I wasn't careful enough in this regard. He was a man who truly didn't have a mean bone in his body. That said, even though the general consensus is that Siskel & Ebert were at their best when in disagreement, I've always thought they were never better than when dealing with a film they both disliked and I can't recall one where they had more fun than with the Robin Williams vehicle "Patch Adams" (based on a true story). Roger's written review skewers the film simply by dishing the truth behind its awfulness while providing several times its entertainment value. The best possible evaluation about this piece comes from a story Roger once told: he mentioned once running into the real Patch Adams while on a conference in Colorado, who told him he completely agreed with Roger's opinions about his own life movie.

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