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Split

It’s exciting to see Shyamalan on such confident footing once more, all these years later.

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Going at the movies

From Wade Mann, Orem UT:

I went to see “Munich” in the nearest local theater. The movie was gripping but also nearly three hours long. About half-way through I felt the very normal and understandable human need to visit a restroom. But I wasn’t about to leave for a minute, afraid I’d miss the most important part (You can just imagine what part my brother decided to run out on when he visited the facilities in the middle of “Matchstick Men”). So I endured for an hour and a half so that I wouldn’t miss a minute of Spielberg’s masterpiece.

Maybe I have a small bladder, but I’ve never even been able to buy a soda while going to the theater since the excruciating experience when I was twelve years-old, bouncing up and down in agony during the last half of another one of Spielberg’s exciting experiences, “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade.” As if anyone would be able to leave in the middle of an Indiana Jones movie.

Why is it that theaters don’t offer a quick few minutes in the middle the movie to make a quick run to the loo? I think they call it an intermission. It’s gotten to the point where my home dvd experience on my flat cinema screen and thx surround sound system offers me everything I want from a movie theater experience, and I can always pause it any time I need to take care of nature. A simple intermission would be just one of many innovations that could inspire customers to not just wait for the dvd release of the movies they want to see.

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