In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

RogerEbert.com

Thumb_1xhk6o9re7godwsywy9dokwtkjx

Get Hard

In this exuberant but ultimately simpleminded comedy, a car wash owner (Kevin Hart) helps a wimpy hedge fund manager (Will Ferrell) get ready for prison…

Thumb_feher_isten_ver2

White God

Imagine an "R" rated "Lassie" by way of "Spartacus." That's Kornél Mundruczó's "White God," a brutal but stirring fantasy about street dogs rising up against…

Other Reviews
Review Archives
Thumb_xbepftvyieurxopaxyzgtgtkwgw

Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

Thumb_jrluxpegcv11ostmz1fqha1bkxq

Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

Other Reviews
Great Movie Archives
Other Articles
Channel Archives

Dear Peter Debruge: about your defense of 3-D...

From Nathan Donarum, Red Hook, NY:

I just read Peter Debruge's letter to the editor defending 3-D. The problem is, where's the defense? I didn't see any. All I saw was an attack on Roger Ebert's article against 3D. And the problem is, I don't really think that those defending 3D have much of a case to make.

3D is a gimmick. At least right now it is. I saw the Toy Story double feature in 3D, which Debruge holds up as an example of 3D done right. My issue is that, if that's 3D done right, then why are we doing 3D at all? It didn't improve the movie. It didn't make the movie better. It just changed the experience, and not in any significant way. There were many times throughout the two movies that I wanted to take off my glasses, but then remembered that the picture would look messed up.

And that's, I guess, where my problem is. If 3D doesn't improve a movie, then what's its point? Is there a rational reason to do it for the audience, for the viewers? I can't find one. And if there isn't one, then we have to accept that 3D is simply a way to get more money per seat in the theater. Ticket sales are not doing as well as studios would like. Neither are DVD sales, nor Blu-Ray sales, and now you have studios like Fox trying to figure out a way to make streaming websites and websites like Netflix illegal.

So where does that leave us? It basically leaves us with a gimmick that, while fun (sometimes), doesn't really offer us anything special, and doesn't really improve upon or better the films its attached to. It gives us a DIFFERENT experience, but a different experience does not necessarily mean a better one. 3D is, I think, here to stay. But we should all be aware of what it really is, and not make high-flying remarks about how its "the future of cinema". If, in the future, all movies are in 3D, I will be greatly depressed.

Popular Blog Posts

“The Breakfast Club”, 30 Years Later: A Conversation Across Generations

A film teacher looks back on "The Breakfast Club," partly through the eyes of her students.

No Animals Were Harmed: The Unique Perspective of “White God”

A piece on the use of animals in film in light of "White God".

Who do you read? Good Roger, or Bad Roger?

This message came to me from a reader named Peter Svensland. He and a fr...

The Melodrama Of Woody Allen’s Critical Reputation

The conversation about Woody Allen's personal and professional lives intertwining continues, but to what end?

Reveal Comments
comments powered by Disqus