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Don't Breathe

Don’t Breathe gets a little less interesting as it proceeds to its inevitable conclusion, but it works so well up to that point that your…

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Southside With You

Southside with You builds its emotional richness by coasting on the charisma of its two leads as they carefully navigate each other’s personality quirks and…

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Bush: The real 'Inside Man'?

From: Jamie Cowan

I was blown away by Spike Lee's "Inside Man." I spent the whole movie trying to figure out what sort of "Gotcha" moment he had in store for us, and I never caught on until he wanted us to. Also, as soon as the Nazi finance angle came in, I thought of Prescott Bush. Then, in Christopher Plummer's office, there was a picture of the Bush family on the credenza behind Plummer's desk. There was also one of Plummer with Maggie Thatcher (we're close), but I digress.

After the movie, I got to thinking about how Prescott's son was elected vice president and president, and his grandson was elected president twice, despite the fact that the family got rich from helping finance the Nazi war machine. Would Christopher Plummer really have to worry about consequences in the real world, when it seems that war crimes committed by the rich and powerful don't?

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