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The Age of Adaline

Though it's hampered by rather bloodless lead performances, this story of an ageless woman and her two great loves finds its tone in its second…

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Little Boy

It’s meant to be a tale of uplift for faith-based audiences, but instead wears viewers down with a heavy-handed narrative, an overbearing score and voiceover…

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

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Jerry Bruck: Making "I.F. Stone's Weekly"

68 school year: That was the year of student demonstrations and the fateful Democratic convention. He met I. F. Stone for the first time that year at a student press meeting at Valparaiso University, just before the convention. And the idea of making a movie about him gradually took hold.

To warm up, Bruck said, he did an unsuccessful short documentary named "Celebration": "It was about Rennie Davis' unsuccessful attempts to turn the Nixon inaugural into a shambles." He made enough mistakes on that one to form some notion of how he wanted to approach the Stone project, and once Stone agreed, Bruck kept the project alive (he frankly explains) by "milking rich liberals."

When the film was finished, Bruck recruited New York Times columnist Tom Wicker to narrate it, mostly because of Wicker's regard for Stone. And since the movie's successful launching, Bruck says, he has gone around the country with a print under his arm: "Any movie can work if you put in a large enough investment of time and love."

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