In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”



This is one of the best films of 2015.

Other Reviews
Review Archives

Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…


Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

Other Reviews
Great Movie Archives
Other Articles
Festivals & Awards Archives
Other Articles
Channel Archives

Interview with Richard Widmark

The good thing about "Madigan," Richard Widmark said, "is that it's a straight, juicy, hard-boiled cop movie, period.

"I have this kind of nostalgia for crime films," he said. "I think we've about exhausted the fancy angles and trick cigarette lighters. Hollywood developed the crime film almost into an art over the years, and it hurt me to see all that work thrown away on spoofs and put-ons."

Widmark has made a lot of good cop movies during his career, although frequently on the wrong side of the law. In his first film, "Kiss of Death" (1948), he laughed fiendishly and pushed that old lady in a wheelchair down a flight of stairs. Twenty years later, moviegoers still remember that scene.

His latest, "Madigan," was shot partly on location in New York's Spanish Harlem, where Widmark and Harry Guardino play detectives given 48 hours to catch a killer.

"We got some good realistic scenes, but finally we had to get out," he said. "We have some gunfights near the end of the film and the police were afraid we might inspire the real thing."

How have crime movies changed between "Kiss of Death" and "Madigan"?

"I don't know," Widmark said, "or if I do, I'd better not say. There's something suspicious about a guy who's too articulate about his work. It's like John Ford says about Westerns, he makes them because he enjoys working in the fresh air."

Widmark said his own favorite films include two in which Ford directed him: "Two Rode Together" and "Cheyenne Autumn." "I also remember 'Panic in the Streets,' directed by Elia Kazan, very fondly," he said. "I got into Ford's films rather late, long after he had his stable of performers built up, but I'm glad I got him as a director at all."

Widmark is currently working on "Patch," a Western. "And then I'd like to do another crime movie," he said "I'll probably produce it myself. A realistic movie shot in the streets. You know where I want to shoot it? Chicago."

Popular Blog Posts

Anton Ego and Jesse Eisenberg: some notes on the presumed objectivity of critics

Matt Zoller Seitz reviews and reflects upon Jesse Eisenberg's New Yorker piece about film critics.

The Strange Case of "The Other Side of Midnight"

The film that Fox packaged with "Star Wars" to get theaters to play a little space opera no one had heard of was "The...

Thumbnails 11/19/15

The greatest actor alive: Max Von Sydow; Conversations with ISIS fighters; There are Christian terrorists; Greg Berla...

Reveal Comments
comments powered by Disqus