In Memoriam 1942 – 2013 “Roger Ebert loved movies.”

RogerEbert.com

Thumb_men_women_and_children

Men, Women & Children

A potentially interesting premise is handled so badly that what might have been a provocative drama quickly and irrevocably devolves into the technological equivalent of…

Thumb_boxtrolls_ver13

The Boxtrolls

"The Boxtrolls" is a beautiful example of the potential in LAIKA's stop-motion approach, and the images onscreen are tactile and layered. But, as always, it's…

Other Reviews
Review Archives
Thumb_xbepftvyieurxopaxyzgtgtkwgw

Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

Thumb_jrluxpegcv11ostmz1fqha1bkxq

Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

Other Reviews
Great Movie Archives

Quirky `Little Voice' gets the call to be this year's opener

The Chicago International Film Festival has not always been distinguished by its choice of opening-night films. Some never subsequently opened commercially, and at least one sent Junior Leaguers fleeing from the theater. But Mark Herman's "Little Voice," which opens this year's festival tonight, is a splendid choice - a film that may pick up an Oscar nomination or two.

It's one of those quirky little English comedies proving that the Brits really do make a specialty of eccentricity. Jane Horrocks (from TV's "Absolutely Fabulous") stars as a young woman who sits upstairs all day in her room, listening obsessively to pop and jazz classics collected by her late father, who had a record store. She never speaks.

Meanwhile, her mother (Brenda Blethyn, from "Secrets and Lies") hangs out at the local pub. She's a good-time girl, plied with drinks by a seedy club promoter (Michael Caine) who has fallen on hard times. One night she brings him home, and during their pre-dalliance drinking, he hears the extraordinary voice of the girl upstairs.

Turns out the daughter can sing just like Marilyn Monroe. Exactly. Uncannily. And like Billie Holiday. And Shirley Bassey. And Ethel Merman. She may not speak, but what a voice! The Caine character immediately recognizes his opportunity and books her into a local club - setting the rest of the plot into action.

The first of the film's closing credits assures us that Jane Horrocks did all of her own singing. I'm pleased they put that credit first, because it was exactly what I wanted to know. She sounds so much like the singers she was imitating that I assumed she was lip-syncing to recordings. It's an amazing performance in a very amusing movie.

Popular Blog Posts

Who do you read? Good Roger, or Bad Roger?

This message came to me from a reader named Peter Svensland. He and a fr...

The Unloved, Part Ten: "The Village"

Part ten in Scout Tafoya's The Unloved series tackles "The Village."

Why my video essay about "All that Jazz" is not on the Criterion blu-ray

Bob Fosse's masterpiece "All That Jazz" jumps back and forth through the past and the present, and through memory and...

Reveal Comments
comments powered by Disqus