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Blue Ruin

Jeremy Saulnier makes a striking debut that brings to mind Blood Simple and Pulp Fiction.

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The Other Woman

While "The Other Woman" raises some thoughtful questions about independence, identity and the importance of sisterhood, ultimately it would rather poop on them and then…

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Ballad of Narayama

"The Ballad of Narayama" is a Japanese film of great beauty and elegant artifice, telling a story of startling cruelty. What a space it opens…

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Monsieur Hire

Patrice Leconte's "Monsieur Hire" is a tragedy about loneliness and erotomania, told about two solitary people who have nothing else in common. It involves a…

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Lisa Nesselson

Lisa Nesselson

A well-rounded individual whose interests include movies, cinema and film, Chicagoan Lisa Nesselson has been writing and broadcasting from Paris for over 25 years, including 17 years with "Variety."

As in-house film critic for France's answer to CNN she gets to hold forth every week on France24. Lisa reviews for SCREEN INTERNATIONAL and is a panelist on French national radio station France-Culture's arts program "La Dispute." In a shameless ploy to pad her resumé, be it known that she (somehow) completed the annual invitational Run-Up the Empire State Building from 1983-1987. She has translated biographies of Clint Eastwood, Simone de Beauvoir and Henri Langlois from French into English. This and a Metro ticket will get her on the Metro.

Lisa reviews for SCREEN INTERNATIONAL and is a panelist on French national radio station France-Culture's arts program "La Dispute." In a shameless ploy to pad her resumé, be it known that she (somehow) completed the annual invitational Run-Up the Empire State Building from 1983-1987. She has translated biographies of Clint Eastwood, Simone de Beauvoir and Henri Langlois from French into English. This and a Metro ticket will get her on the Metro.

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You Ain't Seen Nothin' Yet

(2013)

Black designers show the French a thing or deux

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For those of us who missed our calling as jet setters, socialites or fashion models along comes the edifying, spritely documentary "Versailles '73: American Runway Revolution" to show us how much work it is to be spontaneously fabulous.

Nearly 40 years ago, in late November of 1973, something rather momentous happened at the Opéra Royal on the grounds of the King's old digs outside Paris. In the course of a fashion show that Women's Wear Daily dubbed "The Battle of Versailles," boldly assertive American runway models -- many of whom were what we now call African-American -- wore sporty, comfortable American designer clothes with such, well, panache that the absolute supremacy of French haute couture was dented for good.

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Lisa Nesselson from Paris: On the man who made you think you spoke French

May Contain Spoilers

Paris, Jan. 11 -- The phone rang at 5:30 p.m.. It was France's around-the-clock cable news station France24 asking if I could speak about the death of Eric Rohmer, live, in about 10 minutes. The news was very fresh in France and this was the first I'd heard of it.

Except for François Truffaut and Louis Malle, who both died relatively young, the most prolific talents of the French New Wave era are still at it. Claude Chabrol makes at least one film a year; Jacques Rivette and Alain Resnais released new features in 2009; Agnes Varda is busy mounting conceptual installations when she's not making her delightful documentaries; Jean-Luc Godard is still tinkering away on digital video.

You begin to think they're immortal -- that much like symphony conductors who live to ripe old ages because waving their arms around is excellent exercise, that "pointing into the distance" pose so characteristic of film directors may be a boon to their longevity.

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Why do they always attack the USA?

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PARIS -- Actor Stephane Freiss, who voices Hugh Laurie's mad scientist character in the French dub of "Monsters vs. Aliens," took advantage of the film's Paris press conference to ask producers Jeffrey Katzenberg: "Why DO aliens in movies always attack the U.S.?"

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